ENGL 102. Modern Western Literature. (2 Credits)

A survey of modern western literature with emphasis on genres prominent in the 19th and 20th centuries.

ENGL 111. Studies in Western Literature. (4 Credits)

An introduction to Western literature for non-majors that equips students for life-long learning by teaching them the skills of literary study. Students will investigate enduring or perennial questions of Western literature and culture, including what comprises a "classic" or canonical text, in the context of either 1) a focused investigation of an influential period or author(s) or 2) a survey of texts that are joined by genre or central theme(s). The course will develop students' abilities to apply close-reading practices; to situate their interpretations within relevant literary, historical, biographical and/or cultural contexts and traditions; and to employ genre conventions in their writing. Across the semester, students will also reflect on the readings' harmony with and dissonance from Christian theological traditions, as well as the value of reading literature for the Christian life.

Tags: LE

ENGL 112. Studies in Western Literature: Comedy and Tragedy. (4 Credits)

An introduction to Western literature (specifically the genres of comedy and tragedy) for non-majors that equips students for life-long learning by teaching them the skills of literary study. Students will investigate enduring or perennial questions of Western literature and culture, including what comprises a "classic" or canonical text, in the context of either 1) a focused investigation of an influential period or author(s) or 2) a survey of texts that are joined by genre or central theme(s). The course will develop students' abilities to apply close-reading practices; to situate their interpretations within relevant literary, historical, biographical and/or cultural contexts and traditions; and to employ genre conventions in their writing. Across the semester, students will also reflect on the readings' harmony with and dissonance from Christian theological traditions, as well as the value of reading literature for the Christian life.

Tags: LE, VPAT

ENGL 115. Topics in Modern Global Literature. (4 Credits)

An introduction to diverse literatures since 1700. Students will track literary conversations, concerns, and historical events and other phenomena that interconnect people across geopolitical borders. The particular regions and literary genres covered depend upon the course theme.

Tags: LE

ENGL 202. Topics in Literary Explorations and Global Perspectives. (4 Credits)

This course, which will exist in numerous topical instantiations, is designed to facilitate students' substantive engagement with global culture through an exploration of the formal and generic elements of literature. Within a sustained focus on analyzing multiple examples of literature of at least one cultural group outside the Anglo/AngloAmerican context within its historical/cultural context, students will practice literary and cultural analysis with an aim of illuminating not only the literature and culture, but also the students' Christian theological understanding and personal response to the literature and culture.

Tags: GP, LE

ENGL 215. Classical and Early British Literature. (4 Credits)

An overview of Classical and early British literature, introducing students to major eras, authors, and genres through the sixteenth-century.

Tags: LE

ENGL 225. Topical Seminar. (4 Credits)

A topical seminar that introduces students to terms and techniques of literary analysis, important questions within the discipline, and the research process. Pre-requisite: ENGL 215

ENGL 226. Topical Seminar: Shakespeare. (4 Credits)

A topical seminar that introduces students to terms and techniques of literary analysis, important questions within the discipline, and the research process. This course will focus on William Shakespeare. Required for students seeking teacher licensure. Pre-requisite: ENGL 215

ENGL 285. Topics in Global Literature. (2 Credits)

An introductory survey of a literature outside the Western tradition, e.g. the literature of Africa, Latin America, India, or the Far East (China and/or Japan). Legacy diversity course.

ENGL 326. Children's Literature. (2 Credits)

A chronological survey by genre of books written for children, preschool through grade six. (Does not count toward general education requirement or English major.)

ENGL 328. Young Adult Literature. (4 Credits)

Critical analysis and evaluation of contemporary novels for adolescents in grades six through twelve. At least half of the novels discussed in this course will be works outside the Anglo/Anglo American context. (Does not count toward general education requirement. Counts toward the 40 hr. minimum only for teaching concentration students.)

ENGL 331. Medieval Literature. (4 Credits)

Representative major genres of the Middle Ages, including, Arthurian romance, drama, lyric, and frame narrative with a focus on the works of Chaucer

ENGL 336. The English Renaissance. (4 Credits)

The chief literary works of the sixteenth century in their English setting, with emphasis on More, Marlowe, Sidney, Spenser, and Kyd.

ENGL 337. Seventeenth-Century English Literature. (4 Credits)

The metaphysical and Cavalier traditions of poetry, the work of Milton, and a sampling of prose traditions.

ENGL 338. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature. (4 Credits)

Major British writers from 1660 to 1789, including Aphra Behn, Jonathan Swift, Samuel Johnson, and Laurence Sterne. Readings will provide an understanding of literary developments such as Neoclassicism, the Novel the culture of Sensibility, and the Gothic.

ENGL 341. American Literature: Beginnings through Romanticism. (4 Credits)

Early American literature from the writings of exploration and colonization through Romanticism. Writers may include Edwards, Franklin, Douglass, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Melville, Hawthorne, Dickinson.

ENGL 342. American Literature: Realism to Modernism. (4 Credits)

Literature from the Civil War to the Great Depression. Writers may include Twain, Wharton, Chopin, Dreiser, Frost, Eliot, Hemingway, Fitzgerald. Legacy diversity course.

ENGL 343. American Literature after 1945. (4 Credits)

Writers discussed may include Baldwin, O’Connor, Miller, Kerouac, DeLillo, Carver, Levertov, Morrison, Cisneros, Wilbur, Robinson. Legacy diversity course.

ENGL 355. The Romantic Period. (4 Credits)

Major English Romantic writers, 1783-1832, together with a study of the meaning of Romanticism. Includes Jane Austen.

ENGL 361. Victorian Literature. (4 Credits)

The poetry, fiction, prose, and drama of the Victorian era (1832-1901), including major works of Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Hopkins, the Brontës, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, Carlyle, Ruskin, and the Pre-Raphaelites

ENGL 364. British Modernism: 1900-1939. (4 Credits)

An exploration of some of the key authors and themes of 20th century British Literature, with particular emphasis on High Modernism: Joyce, Yeats, Woolf, and their contemporaries.

ENGL 365. British Literature after 1939. (4 Credits)

An exploration of some of the major authors and themes in the literature of the British Isles since the end of World War II.

ENGL 371. Modern European Literature. (4 Credits)

Poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fiction prose from 1850 to the present. Writers may include Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Ibsen, Mann, Kafka, Bonhoeffer, Mandelstam, Levi, Mulisch, Dinesen, and Milosz.

ENGL 373. Literature of the Bible. (4 Credits)

The literary forms and meaning of biblical literature.

ENGL 375. Women Writers. (2 Credits)

A study of major women novelists, essayists, poets, and playwrights from the Middle Ages to the present. Legacy diversity course.

ENGL 378. Studies in Literary Genre. (4 Credits)

Each offering of this course will investigate one of the major literary genres-novel, epic, tragedy, lyric, drama, essay, and so on-investigating its characteristic features and tracing its development over time.

ENGL 379. African-American Literature. (4 Credits)

A survey of the African American literary tradition from Phillis Wheatley and the slave narratives to Toni Morrison. Other writers include Chesnutt, Hurston, Hughes, Wright, Baldwin, Baraka, and Clifton. Legacy diversity course.

ENGL 381. American Literature in Focus: Beginnings Through Romanticism. (2 Credits)

In-depth study of an author or authors, movement, genre, or theme in American literature from its beginnings through romanticism. (2 hour parallel to ENGL 341.)

ENGL 382. American Literature in Focus: Realism to Modernism. (2 Credits)

In-depth study of an author or authors, movement, genre, or theme in American literature from from Realism through Modernism in American literature. (2 hour parallel to ENGL 342.)

ENGL 383. American Literature in Focus: After 1945. (2 Credits)

In-depth study of an author or authors, movement, genre, or theme in American literature after 1945. (2 hour parallel to ENGL 343.)

ENGL 384. Shakespeare. (4 Credits)

The major comedies and tragedies, along with selective study of the history plays and romances.

ENGL 385. Selected Authors. (2 Credits)

In-depth study of a single author or a small number of authors.

ENGL 386. Selected Authors. (4 Credits)

In-depth study of a single author or a small number of authors.

ENGL 387. C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien. (4 Credits)

In this course, we will study the works of two 20th century English writers - Clive Staples Lewis and John Ronald Reuel Tolkien. During our time on Wheaton's campus, we will take advantage of the Marion E. Wade Center's wonderful collections, preparing for our studies in England by conducting research on Lewis' and Tolkien's scholarship and by beginning to investigate the many contexts (e.g., historical, literary, theological, intellectual, cultural) in which they wrote. During our time in England, we will deepen our understanding of the relationships among these figures, their works, their beliefs, and the places that they inhabited. We will tour the colleges where they worked, walk in the gardens where they discussed mythology and belief, enjoy a meal at their favorite pub, attend their churches, and visit their gravesites. A central concern of our course will be to consider the relationship between the real and the fantastic, but we will also take up questions of joy and sorrow, place and power, and faith and fellowship as we travel "there and back again". Corequisite: Participation in Wheaton in England.

Tags: LE

ENGL 388. Jane Austen in Her Time and Ours. (4 Credits)

An in-depth study of Jane Austen's novels that places them within the political, social and cultural contexts of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century England. As students explore Austen's novels in this course, they will develop their abilities to analyze literary works through close reading, to situate their interpretations within relevant contexts, and to explore enduring questions as they reflect on how Austen's ideas interact with Christian theological traditions. They will also develop their abilities to critically analyze historical sources, interpret the past using sound historical reasoning, and articulate connections between historical investigation and Christian conviction and practice as they explore the complexities of England during this time period.

Tags: HP, LE

ENGL 391. American Literature in Focus: Beginnings through Romanticism. (4 Credits)

In-depth study of an author or authors, movement, genre, or theme in American literature from its beginnings through romanticism. (4 hour parallel to ENGL 341.)

ENGL 392. American Literature in Focus: Realism to Modernism. (4 Credits)

In-depth study of an author or authors, movement, genre, or theme in American literature in the period from Realism through Modernism in American literature. (4 hour parallel to ENGL 342.)

ENGL 393. American Literature in Focus: After 1945. (4 Credits)

In-depth study of an author or authors, movement, genre, or theme in American literature after 1945. (4 hour parallel to ENGL 343.)

ENGL 415. The Archaeology of Texts: Bibliographical Investigations. (4 Credits)

An exploration of the overlapping fields of bibliography, textual criticism, and book history as they have developed in the last pne hundred years. Students will both read landmark works within these fields and undertake hands-on applications of the theories that they encounter in readings.

ENGL 431. Christianity and Fantasy. (4 Credits)

An exploration of the complex interrelations of Christianity and the fantastic, primarily in 20th century literature. Authors studied may include George MacDonald, G.K. Chesterton, J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Ursula K. Le Guin, John Crowley, Salman Rushdie, Susanna Clarke, and Neil Gaiman.

ENGL 433. Varied Literary Topics. (2 or 4 Credits)

Selected topics, studied with a view to giving added breadth and depth to the understanding of special areas of literature. Where appropriate, this course may be substituted for listed requirements.

ENGL 434. Modern Literary Theory. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the most influential modern theories about what literature is and how we experience it, with particular emphasis on deconstruction, feminism, New Historicism, and post-colonial criticism.

ENGL 435. History of Literary Criticism. (4 Credits)

Key documents in the history of Western thought about literature, from Plato's banishment of the poets to the advent of Modernism. Other authors studied include Aristotle, Augustine, Dante, Sidney, Kant, Coleridge, Arnold, Nietzsche, and Marx.

ENGL 485. Studies in Wade Center/Special Collections Authors. (2 Credits)

An in-depth study of a single author or a small number of authors included in the Wade Center and/or in Buswell's Special Collections. Students will be introduced to archival research as they explore authors such as C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, G.K. Chesterton, Dorothy L. Sayers, Charles Williams, George MacDonald, and Owen Barfield. (Open to Majors only, does not count for general education.)

ENGL 486. Studies in Wade Center/Special Collections Authors. (4 Credits)

An in-depth study of a single author or a small number of authors included in the Wade Center and/or in Buswell's Special Collections. Students will be introduced to archival research as they explore authors such as C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, G.K. Chesterton, Dorothy L. Sayers, Charles Williams, George MacDonald, and Owen Barfield. (Open to Majors only, does not count for general education.)

ENGL 494. Senior Seminar in English. (4 Credits)

Selected subjects, such as a group of writers, a literary form, or a theme, studied with a view to critical concerns and the integration of Christ at the Core experiences in literary study. Includes vocational component.

ENGL 495. Independent Study. (1 to 4 Credits)

An individually planned program of reading, research, and consultation under the supervision of a member of the department.

ENGL 496. Literature Internship. (1 to 4 Credits)

English Department approval. Graded pass/fail.

ENGL 499. Honors Thesis. (4 Credits)

An independent scholarly project requiring original research and culminating in an oral defense. By application only.