The A. Duane Litfin Divinity School at Wheaton College prepares students for the work of ministry within a liberal arts education environment committed to the biblical, theological, and spiritual formation of God’s people. Our programs and faculty focus on developing biblically grounded, theologically formed, and spiritually maturing leaders to equip God’s people for advancing the gospel worldwide.

Litfin Divinity School programs prepare students for a lifetime of ministry leadership in a variety of vocational settings by developing the tools and resources necessary to study the Bible, understand the history of the church, and reflect theologically on the challenging questions facing God’s people today. Together, these commitments provide a broad set of resources necessary for effectively preparing students to serve Christ and his Kingdom in the world today.

Biblical and Theological Studies

Assistant Dean, Professor of Old Testament, Andrew Abernethy
Gunther M. Knoedler Professor of Theology, Daniel Treier
Carolyn and Fred McManis Professor of Christian Thought, Timothy Larsen
Franklin S. Dyrness Professor of Biblical & Theological Studies, Jennifer P. McNutt
Scripture Press Ministries Professor of Biblical Studies and Pedagogy, M. Daniel Carroll R. (Rodas)
Blanchard Professor of Old Testament, Richard Schultz
Kenneth T. Wessner Professor of New Testament, Amy Peeler
Professors, Marc Cortez, Adam Miglio
Associate Professor, Esau McCaulley
Emeritus Professors, Daniel Block, Hassell Bullock, Gary Burge, Walter Elwell, Gene Green, Andrew Hill, Karen Jobes, Douglas Moo, Mark Noll, John Walton

Ministry and Evangelism

Assistant Dean, Associate Professor of Evangelism and Leadership, Rochelle Scheuermann
Jean Kvamme Distinguished Professor of Biblical Studies and Public Christianity, John Dickson
Associate Professor of Ministry and Leadership, Michael Hakmin Lee
Executive Director of the WCBGC Research, Church Evangelism, and Preaching Institutes; Luis Palau Endowed Chair of Evangelism; Professor of Evangelism and Leadership, Rick Richardson
Director of Research and Assistant Professor of Ministry, Eunice Hong
Professors Emeriti, Robert Gallagher, Scott Moreau, Jerry Root

Spiritual Formation and Leadership

Assistant Dean, Associate Professor of Ministry and Evangelism, Junias Venugopal
Associate Professor of Higher Education and Student Development, Olga Dietlin
Chair, Department of Christian Formation and Ministry; Associate Lecturer of Christian Formation and Ministry, Dan Haase
Assistant Professor of Outdoor and Adventure Leadership, Muhia Karianjahi
Associate Professor of Christian Formation and Ministry, Barrett McRay
Executive Director of HoneyRock; Assistant Professor of Outdoor and Adventure Leadership, Rob Ribbe
Price-LeBar Professor of Christian Formation and Ministry, David Setran
Christian Formation and Ministry Internship Coordinator & Guest Instructor, Sherri Shackel
Professors Emeriti, Scottie May, Tom Schwanda, ​Jim Wilhoit

Deadlines and requirements will vary depending on degree and program.  See Graduate Admissions  in the catalog for additional information or go to Wheaton College Graduate School Admissions:

Wheaton College Graduate School
Graduate Admissions
Toll free: 800.888.0141 or 630.752.5195

https://www.wheaton.edu/graduate-school/admissions

Biblical and Theological Studies

Archaeology

ARCH 515. Ugaritic Language and Literature. (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the language, literature, and culture from the ancient city-state of Ugarit. It is designed to teach students essential morphology and syntax of the Ugaritic prose and poetic texts, to orientate students to the discipline of Ugaritology, and to facilitate a better understanding of the Old Testament through the study of its linguistic and cultural context. Prerequisite: HEBR 301 or permission of instructor.

ARCH 516. Classical Hebrew Inscriptions. (4 Credits)

See ARCH 416.

ARCH 517. Egyptian Hieroglyphics. (4 Credits)

An introduction to Middle Egyptian which involves learning how to read and translate texts.

ARCH 518. Akkadian Cuneiform. (2 or 4 Credits)

An introduction to cuneiform which leads students through the techniques for transcription, transliteration, and translation of Assyrian or Babylonian literature.

ARCH 521. Advanced Archaeology and the Old Testament. (4 Credits)

A study of ancient Near Eastern archaeological methods and materials and their relationship to the historical, social, and religious settings of the Old Testament, with special emphasis on Israel's early history and the monarchic periods.

ARCH 525. Archaeological Field Work. (8 Credits)

Field experience involving excavation, interpretation, and studies in related regional archaeology.

ARCH 526. Method & Theory. (2 Credits)

A basic examination of the field of archaeology and how the history of the field affects current practice. Graded pass/fail unless petitioned for a grade.

ARCH 534. Historical Geography. (2 Credits)

A study of selected biblical episodes which are enriched when understood in the context of Near Eastern history and Palestinian geography. Prerequisite: BITH 211 or 221 or 312, or ARCH 211.

ARCH 545. Archaeology of the Classical World. (2 Credits)

Excavations, monuments, epigraphic materials, and papyri from the Minoan, Mycenaean, Aegean, and Greco-Roman times.

ARCH 554. Topics in Archaeology. (2 or 4 Credits)

Separate courses devoted to specialized topics in archaeology.

ARCH 556. Jewish Backgrounds of the New Testament. (2 Credits)

A study of the history, literature, archaeology and thought within Judaism in the Hellenistic and early Roman periods through surveying Jewish texts and archaeological sites. In providing an important backdrop to the understanding and interpretation of the New Testament, emphasis will fall on the political and economic forces at work in Palestine, the religious ideas and practices of the time, and their connections to the New Testament. Cross-listed with BITH 456, BITH 556, and ARCH 456.

ARCH 565. Statecraft and International Relations in the Ancient Near East. (4 Credits)

See ARCH 365.

ARCH 569. Religion of Israel and ANE. (4 Credits)

See ARCH 369.

ARCH 594. Seminar: Current Issues. (2 Credits)

A seminar devoted to exploring the current issues in Near Eastern archaeology that relate to biblical studies, especially those touching on historiography, historicity, social and cultural backgrounds, methodology, and faith.

ARCH 695. Independent Study. (2 or 4 Credits)

Independent Study

Biblical and Theological Studies

BITH 502. Hebrew. (4 Credits)

Basic grammar, syntax, and vocabulary with readings from the Old Testament and modern Hebrew authors. Prerequisite: HEBR 101

BITH 503. Language Study I. (2 or 4 Credits)

Graduate-level study of an ancient or modern language in conjunction with a one semester or advanced language course taught at Wheaton College. Requires advisor’s approval and permission of instructor.

BITH 504. Language Study II. (2 or 4 Credits)

Graduate-level study of an ancient or modern language in conjunction with a second semester language course taught at Wheaton College. Requires advisor’s approval and permission of instructor.

BITH 505. Language Study III. (2 or 4 Credits)

Graduate-level study of an ancient or modern language in conjunction with a one semester or advanced language course taught at Wheaton College. Requires advisor’s approval and permission of instructor.

BITH 506. Language Study. (0 Credits)

Graduate-level study of an ancient or modern language in conjunction with a one semester or advanced language course taught at Wheaton College. Requires advisor's approval and permission of instructor.

BITH 507. Hermeneutics for Biblical Exegesis. (4 Credits)

A survey of hermeneutics that probes the theoretical underpinnings of grammatical-historical interpretation, the hermeneutics of the apostles, and the contributions of marginalized voices. These insights will then be applied to reading texts from each testament in light of genre conventions, ancient cultural contexts, the canonical nature of Scripture, and contemporary contexts. The course provides the theoretical and practical foundations necessary for more advanced courses in Biblical Exegesis.

BITH 508. Intro to Hebrew Exegesis. (4 Credits)

Hebrew language course designed for MA Biblical Exegesis students. Course will continue to develop student language acquisition through review of grammar and syntax, and through intensive reading of selected biblical texts. Introduction will be given to textual criticism, lexical semantics, and the Masoretic text. Prerequisite: HEBR 101 and HEBR 102.

BITH 509. Introduction to Greek Exegesis. (4 Credits)

Greek language course designed for MA Biblical Exegesis students. Course will continue to develop student language acquisition through review of grammar and syntax, and through intensive reading of selected biblical texts. Introduction will be given to textual criticism, lexical semantics, and modern editions of the Greek NT. Prerequisites: GREK 101 and GREK 102; or the equivalent.

BITH 517. Studies in Biblical Lands. (4 Credits)

A study of cultural, historical, geographical, and theological dimensions of the Old Testament, New Testament, and the Church through classroom lecture and travel to Israel, Greece, Turkey, and Rome. In addition, through contact with leaders and communities of non-western churches, Wheaton in the Holy Lands engages students with issues of the theological development of the Church down through the centuries. Summer only.

BITH 518. Studies in Biblical Lands. (4 Credits)

A study of cultural, historical, geographical, and theological dimensions of the Old Testament, New Testament, and the Church through classroom lecture and travel to Israel, Greece, Turkey, and Rome. In addition, through contact with leaders and communities of non-western churches, Wheaton in the Holy Lands engages students with issues of the theological development of the Church down through the centuries. Summer only.

BITH 521. Theology Of Education. (2 Credits)

An examination of fundamental theological issues underlying education, including the relationship of revelation to other disciplines, the Christian conception of persons and knowing, and the relationship of the Church to culture. Required for the Master of Arts in Teaching degree.

BITH 524. Intro to Hermeneutics. (2 Credits)

A theoretical complement to the methodology courses of BITH 542 and BITH 531. This course situates grammatical-historical biblical exegesis in a Christian hermeneutic, with a view to understanding the supporting rationale, life habits, and the aims of our exegetical practices within our life as God’s people. Topics include: the history of hermeneutics; historical and theological approaches to interpretation; World Christian Perspectives; the importance and relations of authors, texts, readers, and divine agency; translation in word and life. This course is a prerequisite for BITH 532, BITH 635, and BITH 646 and a co-requisite for BITH 542 (Old Testament Hermeneutics) and BITH 531 (New Testament Hermeneutics).

BITH 525. Biblical Theology. (4 Credits)

A study of the major theological themes within the Old and New Testaments, based upon the biblical text and the writings of major biblical theologians. The course will also consider the historical development and interrelationship of these themes throughout the successive periods of biblical history.

BITH 526. Biblical Foundations of Worship. (4 Credits)

An examination of worship in the Bible, both Old and New Testament, with a view to developing a theology of worship that is consistent with the teachings of Scripture. Special attention will be given to the role of sign and symbol and the place of visual arts in Christian worship. The course will also explore the interface between the discipline of Positive Psychology and Christian religious belief and practice, especially as it relates to worship and spiritual formation. Undergraduate students, Prerequisite: BITH 211 or 221 or 312, or ARCH 211; or BITH 213 or 317, or ARCH 213.

Tags: SI, VPAV

BITH 528. Introduction to New Testament Exegesis. (2 Credits)

A practical hermeneutics course, orienting students to the principles and praxis of New Testament grammatical-historical exegesis. Focusing on selected Greek texts chosen from various genres, attention will be given to the literary and rhetorical strategies employed by biblical authors to achieve their intended goals. Particular issues to be addressed include textual criticism, lexical and grammatical analysis, compositional style and genre and the broader canonical and historical contexts. This course is a prerequisite for BITH 646 and BITH 532. Prerequisite: Greek language competency.

BITH 531. New Testament Hermeneutics. (2 Credits)

This course will introduce those specific principles, resources, and skills that are necessary for interpreting New Testament texts that are not dependent on a mastery of the biblical languages. Primary attention will be given to genre analysis, socio-cultural worldview, biblical criticism (including issues of authorship and date of composition for individual books), the significance of the history of interpretation and the role of theology in informing interpretation. The focus throughout will be on building methods useful for exegeting the text. Prerequisite: BITH 524 Introduction to Hermeneutics.

BITH 532. Greek Exegesis in the Septuagint. (2 or 4 Credits)

Introduces the Greek Old Testament and modern Septuagintal studies. Exegesis of selected passages of the Greek Old Testament with special reference to the corresponding passage in the Hebrew text and, when relevant, its use in the New Testament. Prerequisite: BITH 524 and BITH 528, completion of Greek competency and one year of Hebrew or instructor’s approval. Counts toward Greek exegesis requirement in Biblical Exegesis program.

BITH 533. Exploring the Old Testament. (4 Credits)

This course explores the Old Testament, with special attention given to the storyline, historical contexts, and genres across all sections of the Old Testament canon with the of mobilizing students to interpret Scripture.

BITH 534. Pentateuch. (4 Credits)

Primeval and patriarchal history. God's sovereign rule as Creator and the choice and development of Israel as his special people. A study of the relationship between law and covenant and of Israel as a worshiping community.

BITH 535. Prophets & Prophecy. (2 Credits)

A study of the phenomenon of prophecy in ancient Israel, in its theological and cultural settings. In addition to the critical issues, the major prophets will be examined and their message and theology studied as part of the mainstream of the prophetic movement.

BITH 536. Old Testament Book Studies from the English Text. (2 or 4 Credits)

Studies of the content, message, and contemporary relevance of selected portions of the Old Testament against the background and the setting of the original writer and recipients.

BITH 537. Old Testament I: Pentateuch & Historical Books. (4 Credits)

A comprehensive study of the first half of the Old Testament, from Genesis through Esther, with special attention given to the place of biblical criticism, cultural backgrounds and biblical theology in scriptural interpretation. This course is only open to students in the MA Biblical Studies program.

BITH 538. Old Testament II: Prophets & Wisdom Books. (4 Credits)

A comprehensive study of the second half of the Old Testament, from Psalms through Malachi, with special attention given to the place of biblical criticism, cultural backgrounds and biblical theology in scriptural interpretation. This course is only open to students in the MA Biblical Studies program.

BITH 539. Ancient Near East Backgrounds of the Old Testament. (2 Credits)

An introduction to background and comparative studies that will focus on methodology and the conceptual world of the ancient Near East. As the cultures and literatures are compared both similarities and differences will emerge and be evaluated for their impact and role in the exegesis of the biblical text.

BITH 541. Issues in Modern Old Testament Studies. (2 Credits)

An introduction to the history and contemporary practice of modern Old Testament studies. Methods will be assessed in terms of their plausibility, theological implications, and contribution to understanding the Old Testament.

BITH 542. Old Testament Hermeneutics. (2 Credits)

This course will introduce and utilize specific principles, resources, and skills that are necessary for interpreting Old Testament texts but not dependent on a mastery of the biblical languages. Primary attention will be given to genre analysis, socio-cultural worldview, biblical criticism (including issues of authorship and date of composition for individual books), and the theological shape of the Hebrew canon, as well as the potential contribution of these subdisciplines to the exegetical task. Prerequisite: BITH 524 Introduction to Hermeneutics.

BITH 543. Issues in Modern New Testament Studies. (2 Credits)

An introduction to the history and contemporary practice of modern New Testament studies. Methods will be assessed in terms of their plausibility, theological implications, and contribution to understanding the new Testament.

BITH 544. New Testament I: Jesus & the Gospels. (4 Credits)

The course introduces the student to the life and teachings of Jesus and to the development of the early church, focusing on the four gospels with special attention given to the place of biblical criticism, cultural backgrounds and biblical theology in scriptural interpretation. This course is only open to students in the MA Biblical Studies program.

BITH 545. New Testament II: Acts to Revelation. (4 Credits)

The course examines the book of Acts, Pauline letters, Catholic epistles and book of Revelation, with special attention given to the place of biblical criticism, cultural backgrounds and biblical theology in scriptural interpretation. This course is only open to students in the MA Biblical Studies program.

BITH 546. New Testament Book Studies from the English Text. (2 or 4 Credits)

The content, message, and contemporary relevance of selected portions of the New Testament against the background of the setting of the original writer and recipients. Logical units of the NT literature.

BITH 547. Life and Teachings of Jesus. (4 Credits)

The events and teachings of Jesus in their contemporary context together with an analysis of current relevant research.

BITH 548. Life and Teachings Of Paul. (4 Credits)

The major aspects of the teachings of Paul in the context of his life and times as reflected in selected parts of his letters and Acts.

BITH 551. Greco-Roman Backgrounds of NT. (2 Credits)

An introductory study of the Greco-Roman world, including its history, society, culture, religion, and literature, in relation to the expansion of early Christianity and the New Testament documents.

BITH 553. New Testament and Early Christian History. (4 Credits)

An investigation of the history, literature, and theology of the New Testament and Christianity prior to A.D. 325.

BITH 554. Topics In Archaeology. (2 or 4 Credits)

Separate courses devoted to specialized topics in archaeology.

BITH 555. Exploring the New Testament. (4 Credits)

The course introduces the student to the life and teachings of Jesus, the development of the early church, Pauline and general letters, and the book of Revelation. The focus is on biblical story and theology, and historical and cultural backgrounds in scriptural interpretation.

BITH 556. Jewish Backgrounds of the New Testament. (2 Credits)

A study of the history, literature, archaeology and thought within Judaism in the Hellenistic and early Roman periods through surveying Jewish texts and archaeological sites. In providing an important backdrop to the understanding and interpretation of the New Testament, emphasis will fall on the political and economic forces at work in Palestine, the religious ideas and practices of the time, and their connections to the New Testament. Cross-listed with ARCH 456, ARCH 556, and BITH 456.

BITH 557. Marginalized Voices in Old Testament Studies. (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to important contributions to Old Testament studies from women scholars and from Latin American and Hispanic (Latino/a), African and African-American, and Asian and Asian-American perspectives.

BITH 558. Topics in Advanced Biblical and Theological Studies. (2 or 4 Credits)

Separate courses devoted to the study of topics of general interest.

BITH 561. Theological Anthropology. (2 Credits)

A theological examination of the nature of persons with special reference to issues raised by modern philosophy and psychology.

BITH 562. Introduction to Old Testament Exegesis. (2 Credits)

A practical hermeneutics course, orienting students to the principles and praxis of Old Testament exegesis. Focusing on selected Hebrew texts, chosen from various genres, attention will be given to the literary and rhetorical strategies employed by biblical authors to achieve their intended goals. Particular issues to be addressed include textual criticism, lexical and grammatical analysis, compositional style and genre and the broader canonical and historical contexts. Prerequisites: HEBR 301, 302, 401.

BITH 563. Apologetics. (2 Credits)

Survey of the theological resources for meeting contemporary challenges to Christianity, including the problems of secularism, pluralism, evil, and the historicity of Jesus.

BITH 565. Christian Theology. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the methods of systematic theology and the major topics within the biblical revelation. Special attention is given to the rationale for these Christian doctrines, their systematic interconnections as well as their development within the history of Christian thought, and their contemporary challenges.

BITH 566. Foundations for Biblical Interpretation. (4 Credits)

A survey of the principles, methods, and issues of biblical and theological interpretation in the past and present. Intended for students in non-theological disciplines, as well as for those in Biblical and Theological studies who have limited theological preparation.

BITH 567. Church. (2 Credits)

A study of the doctrine of the church, attending to traditional and contemporary debates and formulations. Prerequisite: BITH 315, 318, 372, 374 or 376.

BITH 568. Foundations for Biblical Interpretation. (2 Credits)

A survey of the principles, methods, and issues of biblical and theological interpretation in the past and present. Intended for students in non-theological disciplines, as well as for those in Biblical and Theological studies who have limited theological preparation.

BITH 569. Christian Traditions. (4 Credits)

A survey of the major Christian traditions with an emphasis on their theological presuppositions and systematic thought, including the common tradition of the early church, as well as the Orthodox, Catholic, Reformed, and modern Protestant traditions.

BITH 571. Introduction to the History of Christianity. (2 Credits)

A summary introduction to the history of Christianity designed to provide a rapid but comprehensive overview to assist students who seek basic understanding of the history of Christianity as a background for other fields of study. The emphasis is upon succinct summary, and the course will focus on key turning points in Church history from the early church to the twentieth century. Graduate students will attend the same lectures as undergraduates in HIST 305 but receive different syllabi with different levels of required work.

BITH 572. Doctrine of Scripture. (2 or 4 Credits)

See BITH 392.

BITH 573. Scripture and Theology. (4 Credits)

An in-depth examination of the ways in which theologians use Scripture in formulating theological proposals, both with regard to Christian doctrine (theology) and Christian practice (ethics). The course explores the nature of Scripture, the authority of Scripture, and ways in which the work of theology moves "beyond" Scripture in order to respond to the contemporary situation of the church.

BITH 576. History of Christianity to 1900. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the history of Christianity from the age of the apostles through the nineteenth century. The course treats the development of institutions, doctrines, and interactions with culture. It is divided into approximately equal sections on the early church, the church in the middle ages, the era of the reformation, and the period 1600-1900. The course is meant to be a complement of BITH 577, which focuses on the worldwide expansion of Christianity in the last two centuries.

BITH 577. World Christianity. (4 Credits)

A survey of the history of world Christianity since the middle of the nineteenth century. This course includes some background on the earlier missionary expansion of the Church, but its emphasis is on the transition of Christianity from a western to a world religion in the last two centuries.

BITH 578. Global Church History. (4 Credits)

A survey of the history of world Christianity from the apostolic era to the modern period, with particular emphasis on seminal events, figures, and theological developments. Attention is given to the history of the church in the majority world, global Bibles, and to the contributions of women.

BITH 581. The Reformation. (4 Credits)

The doctrines and practices of the Reformers (1450-1650) in their political, social, economic, and intellectual contexts. Special attention to Luther, the Reformed (Zwingli and Calvin), Anabaptists, the English Reformation, and the Catholic Reformation.

BITH 585. History of Christianity in North America. (4 Credits)

See HIST 483.

BITH 623. The History of Pastoral Care. (2 Credits)

A survey of the principles and techniques of Christian nurture (the care of souls) from the time of Gregory the Great to the modern church in America. Both primary and secondary sources are read in an effort to understand how the church has ministered to persons with various needs and in varied circumstances. (For Psy.D. students or with permission of instructor and department chair.)

BITH 624. Theological Ethics for Counseling. (2 Credits)

A course designed to explore the biblical and theological foundations for a Christian ethic together with a consideration of the main Christian traditions in ethics. Case study applications will be made to issues in counseling. (For Psy.D. students or with permission of instructor and department chair.)

BITH 626. Majority World Theologies. (4 Credits)

Readings and discussions on the task of Biblical interpretation and theological reflection in the contexts of world Christianity. Prerequisites: BITH 533 and BITH 555.

BITH 627. World Religions. (4 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to major religions of the world focusing on their origin and development, beliefs and practices, and worldviews and institutions. The course will also survey major Christian responses to other religions. After successfully completing this class, students will be able to engage people of other faiths respectfully and better equipped to participate in God’s mission in a religiously and culturally pluralistic society.

BITH 631. Intermediate Hebrew. (4 Credits)

A comprehensive study of the basic principles and methods of interpreting the Hebrew Old Testament. Emphasis on reading as a tool to build vocabulary and understanding of Hebrew grammar and syntax. Prerequisite: working knowledge of Hebrew.

BITH 634. Poetic Books. (2 or 4 Credits)

The form and content of Hebrew poetry with its background in ancient Near Eastern literature. An examination of key passages in books such as Psalms, Proverbs, and Job.

BITH 635. Hebrew Exegesis. (4 Credits)

Exegesis of books or selected portions of larger books of the Hebrew Old Testament. Capability of translation is assumed because of the prerequisite. The purpose of the course is not to teach Hebrew grammar, but to interpret the Old Testament from the Hebrew text. Repeatable for different topics. Prerequisite: BITH 524 and BITH 508, or BITH 507 and BITH 508.

BITH 636. Hebrew Exegesis. (2 Credits)

Exegesis of books or selected portions of larger books of the Hebrew Old Testament. Capability of translation is assumed because of the prerequisite. The purpose of the course is not to teach Hebrew grammar, but to interpret the Old Testament from the Hebrew text. Repeatable for different topics. Prerequisite: BITH 524 and BITH 508, or BITH 507 and BITH 508.

BITH 638. Old Testament Theology. (4 Credits)

The major teachings of the various parts and the whole of the Old Testament with concentration upon some of the most important themes in an attempt to discover the intention of the biblical writers.

BITH 639. Advanced Old Testament Topics. (2 or 4 Credits)

Separate courses devoted to the study of specialized topics, issues, or areas within the Old Testament field.

BITH 641. Current Issues in Old Testament Studies. (2 Credits)

An examination of recent trends in Old Testament scholarship with special attention paid to significant problem areas. Prerequisite: BITH 541.

BITH 645. Canonical Biblical Interpretation. (4 Credits)

An integrative course that is the capstone of the M.A. in Biblical Exegesis program. The course enables students to solidify their ability to exegete scripture with canonical sensitivity. It also guides the student in integrating a canonical perspective into the exegetical and hermeneutical enterprise, including relating parts of the testaments to one another and to their particular relevant historical backgrounds within a biblical-theological framework. Various texts and themes throughout the OT and NT will form the basis for the semester’s work. Four hours to be taken in the student’s last spring semester of the program.

BITH 646. Greek Exegesis. (4 Credits)

Exegesis of books or selected portions of larger books of the Greek New Testament. Capability of translation is assumed because of the prerequisite. The purpose of the course is not to teach Greek grammar but to interpret the New Testament from the Greek text. Repeatable for different topics. Prerequisite: BITH 525 and BITH 509, or BITH 507 and BITH 509.

BITH 647. Greek Exegesis. (2 Credits)

Exegesis of books or selected portions of larger books of the Greek New Testament. Capability of translation is assumed because of the prerequisite. The purpose of the course is not to teach Greek grammar but to interpret the New Testament from the Greek text. Repeatable for different topics. Prerequisite: BITH 525 and BITH 509, or BITH 507 and BITH 509.

BITH 648. New Testament Theology. (4 Credits)

An investigation of the dominant themes in the New Testament in the light of the cultures in which they were produced and the methods of representative contemporary New Testament theologians.

BITH 649. Advanced New Testament Topics. (2 or 4 Credits)

Separate courses devoted to the study of specialized topics, issues, or areas within the New Testament field.

BITH 651. Current Issues in New Testament Studies. (2 Credits)

An examination of recent trends in New Testament scholarship with special attention given to significant problem areas. Prerequisite: BITH 543.

BITH 653. Historical Theology: Patristic. (2 Credits)

An examination of the theological developments from the second through the fifth centuries. Special attention is given to the formation of the ecumenical creeds, developments in the doctrines of the canon, God, Christology, soteriology, ecclesiology, and the sacraments, as well as the nuances differentiating the Orthodox and Roman Catholic traditions.

BITH 654. Historical Theology: Medieval Christianity. (2 Credits)

An examination of the theological developments from the fifth through the fourteenth centuries. Special attention is given to the relationship between reason and revelation, soteriology, ecclesiology, the sacraments, and popular piety.

BITH 655. Historical Theology: Reformation. (2 Credits)

An examination of the key theological writings during the Reformation period, including selections by Lutheran, Calvinist, Anabaptist, and Catholic figures.

BITH 656. Historical Theology: Modern. (2 Credits)

An examination of the theological developments from the Enlightenment to the present, focusing on key figures representing nineteenth-century German liberalism, neo-orthodoxy, post-Vatican II Catholicism, liberation, and postmodern theology.

BITH 657. Historical Theology: Patristic and Medieval. (4 Credits)

An examination of the theological developments from the patristic and medieval periods. Special attention is given to the formation of the ecumenical creeds, developments in the doctrines of the canon, God, Christology, soteriology, ecclesiology, and the sacraments, as well as the nuances differentiating the Orthodox and Roman Catholic traditions.

BITH 658. Historical Theology: Reformation and Modern. (4 Credits)

An examination of the theological developments from the Reformation through the modern period. Special attention is given to the nuances differentiating the Protestant and Catholic traditions, the contributions of key Protestant theologians, the impact of the Enlightenment, and key figures representing nineteenth-century German liberalism, neo-orthodoxy, post-Vatican II Catholicism, liberation, and postmodern theology.

BITH 669. Topics In Theology. (2 or 4 Credits)

Selected topics in theology to provide for in-depth study of a selected topic of current interest.

BITH 673. Christian Ethics. (4 Credits)

An investigation of the biblical and theological foundations of Christian ethics, with attention to a range of contemporary moral issues.

BITH 674. Theology and the Liberal Arts. (4 Credits)

An in-depth examination of the interactions that have taken and are taking place between theology and the arts, as well as the natural and human sciences. Students will explore the ways that theology can assist the disciplines to be "for Christ and his kingdom" (and how the disciplines might return the favor to theology).

BITH 675. Advanced Systematic Theology. (4 Credits)

An in-depth examination of theological method and the major theological topics within the traditional loci, employing classical and contemporary theological texts.

BITH 676. Seminar Systematic Theology. (2 or 4 Credits)

676-1 (Section 1) Focused seminars providing for in-depth research of particular persons, movements, events, eras, topics, and themes in Systematic Theology. (2 or 4 credits); 676-2 (Section 2) Focused seminars providing for in-depth research of particular persons, movements, events, eras, topics, and themes in Systematic Theology (assumes an ancient language or modern language research component in primary and/or secondary resource materials). (4 credits)

BITH 677. Topics in the History of Christianity. (2 or 4 Credits)

Separate courses devoted to the study of the Christian church in specific eras or countries, or specific themes in church history.

BITH 679. Seminar in Historical Theology. (2 or 4 Credits)

679-1 (Section 1) Focused seminars providing for in-depth research of particular persons, movements, events, eras, topics, and themes in Historical Theology. (2 or 4 credits); 679-2 (Section 2) Focused seminars providing for in-depth research of particular persons, movements, events, eras, topics, and themes in Historical Theology (assumes an ancient language or modern language research component in primary and/or secondary resource materials). (4 credits)

BITH 682. Colloquium in the History of American Christianity. (2 or 4 Credits)

Special courses in specific aspects or themes of the history of the church in North America. Taught in conjunction with visiting scholars sponsored by the Institute for the Study of American Evangelicals. Course is offered occasionally.

BITH 683. Historiography of the History of Christianity. (2 Credits)

Christianity and history, with emphasis on the history of Church History, the implications for the meaning and practice of history, and the relationship of philosophies of history to the Christian faith.

BITH 684. Vocation Formation in Biblical and Theological Studies. (0 Credits)

This course is encouraged for students considering doctoral work, publishing, teaching, or ministry in the fields of History of Christianity, Theology, or Biblical Studies. This course explores Christian vocation formation in scholarship, professional, and ministry contexts. Readings in Christian vocation formation are assigned and discussed. Class sessions dedicate time to equipping students with practical skills such as in academic writing, research, conference participation, and applying to Ph.D. programs. Publishing as a profession as well as teaching and church/para-church ministry are explored in terms of Christian vocation and skills.

BITH 685. Seminar in Ecclesial Theology. (4 Credits)

An introductory course that explores the ways in which the ecclesia—the history and traditions and the life and ministry of the church—shapes how one reads the Bible and thinks theologically.

BITH 686. Historiography. (4 Credits)

Christianity and history, with emphasis on the history of Church History, the implications for the meaning and practice of history, and the relationship of philosophies of history to the Christian faith.

BITH 687. Seminar in American Christianity and Historical Theology. (2 or 4 Credits)

687-1 (Section 1) Focused seminars providing for in-depth research of particular persons, movements, events, eras, topics, and themes in Church History. (2 or 4 credits); 687-2 (Section 2) Focused seminars providing for in-depth research of particular persons, movements, events, eras, topics, and themes in Church History (assumes an ancient language or modern language research component in primary and/or secondary resource materials). (4 credits)

BITH 689. Biblical and Theological Studies Capstone Seminar. (4 Credits)

An integrative exploration of how biblical and theological themes relate to and inform the student’s understanding of their vocational goals, research interests, and personal formation, as well as how this coursework contributes to the life and ministry of the church both locally and globally. This is an integrated capstone course and should be completed in the final semester of the student’s program.

BITH 692. Graduate Comprehensive Exam. (0 Credits)

Prerequisites: The student should be in the final semester of coursework, have completed all core courses, or have completed all coursework. May be repeated once. Fee $25. Graded pass/fail.

BITH 693. Dossier for Biblical Exegesis. (0 Credits)

A culminating portfolio from coursework within the M.A. in Biblical Exegesis that demonstrates a student's attainment of the program learning outcomes. The dossier will consist of a hermeneutics paper, an exegesis paper, a biblical theology paper, and a theology paper, all of which demonstrate an understanding and engagement with diverse ethnic, gender, and majority world perspectives. This course can only be taken during the final semester of a student's degree and is a requirement for the M.A. in Biblical Exegesis program. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: Final semester of M.A. in Biblical Exegesis.

BITH 694. Theology Capstone Seminar. (4 Credits)

An integrative exploration of how major themes from the MA Theology degree plan relate to and inform the student’s understanding of the scope of theological studies. Students will consider major areas of theological studies, including systematic, historical, biblical, and interdisciplinary connections. This is an integrated capstone course and should be completed in the final semester of the student’s program whenever possible.

BITH 695. Independent Study. (1 to 4 Credits)

Intensive research on a precisely defined topic related to some phase of Biblical and Theological Studies. Initiative for selecting the topic and proposing the methodology rests with the student. A faculty member must approve, recommend amendments (if necessary), supervise, and evaluate the project. Limit four hours in any one degree program except by special permission.

BITH 696. Internship. (2 or 4 Credits)

BITH 698. Thesis. (4 Credits)

BITH 699. Thesis Continuation. (0 Credits)

See M.A. Thesis/Applied Thesis/Action Research.

BITH 711. Seminar in Ecclesial Theology. (4 Credits)

An introductory course that explores the ways in which the ecclesia—the history and traditions and the life and ministry of the church—shapes how one reads the Bible and thinks theologically. (Course effective Spring 2022)

BITH 712. Global Church History. (4 Credits)

A survey of the history of world Christianity from the apostolic era to the modern period, with particular emphasis on seminal events, figures, and theological developments. Attention is given to the history of the church in the majority world, global Bibles, and to the contributions of women. (Course effective Spring 2022)

BITH 713. Old Testament Book Study. (4 Credits)

Describe in broad outline the historical and geographical context in which the book was written and significance of this context for interpreting the OT. Recount the basic content, major theological themes and grand narrative of the book, identifying key people, places, events and dates. Interpret the text as ancient literature with reference to genre and compositional features. Apply basic principles of hermeneutics to interpretation and application of the book. Relate OT teaching to reflection in other courses and disciplines. (Course effective Spring 2022)

BITH 714. New Testament Book Study. (4 Credits)

A study of the background, content, and theology of a New Testament book with emphasis placed on the application of its message to Christian communities in today’s world.

BITH 751. Introduction to Doctoral Research. (0 Credits)

Orientation to doctoral research in theology and to Wheaton's Ph.D. program in Biblical and Theological Studies.

BITH 793. Directed Study. (2 to 4 Credits)

Supervised independent study in conjunction with the auditing of a regular BTS course.

BITH 794. Directed Study in the Liberal Arts. (2 to 4 Credits)

Supervised independent study in conjunction with a regular undergraduate course in the liberal arts.

BITH 795. Guided Research. (1 to 4 Credits)

Supervised independent study.

BITH 798. Supervised Pedagogical Experience. (2 Credits)

Students participate with a faculty member in teaching a course, complete required readings about pedagogy, and experience additional mentoring as teachers.

BITH 811. Theological Hermeneutics in Ministry. (4 Credits)

An opportunity for DMin students to engage with contemporary developments in biblical theology, theological interpretation of Scripture, and the application of hermeneutical theory to ministry praxis, with a focus on evangelical contexts.

BITH 881. Biblical Interpretation & Theology. (4 Credits)

First year PhD students’ orientation to theological interpretation and contemporary practice in biblical theology, with special attention to hermeneutical issues.

BITH 882. Seminar: Topics in Biblical Theology. (4 Credits)

Intense study of a particular topic in biblical theology, normally including work in both Old and New Testaments.

BITH 883. Seminar: Topics in Systematic or Historical Theology. (4 Credits)

Intense study of a particular topic in systematic or historical theology.

BITH 884. Biblical/Theological Integration. (2 Credits)

Second year PhD students’ capstone regarding theological interpretation of Scripture and contemporary practice in biblical theology, with special attention to developing integrative student case study papers in relation to their dissertation subjects.

BITH 898. Dissertation. (0 Credits)

BITH 899. Dissertation Continuation (Full-time). (0 Credits)

BITH 999. Dissertation Continuation (Part-time). (0 Credits)

Ministry and Evangelism

Evangelism

EVAN 501. Advanced Church Evangelism Institute Seminar. (0 Credits)

This seminar examines the biblical and theological foundations of Church, leadership, organizations, and change. Attention is given to various missional church models and movements, and the skills needed to lead change, manage conflict, and move churches and organizations to become missional and evangelistic. Prerequisite: Completion of additional course work which augments the African American Church Evangelism Institute or the Church Evangelism Institute curriculum (as verified by CEI director).

EVAN 502. Public Christianity for a Post Christian World. (4 Credits)

This course examines the context and content of Christian mission in the “pre-Christian world,” from Jewish missionaries of the Second Temple period to the birth of Christendom following the reign of Emperor Constantine, in order learn lessons for the contemporary task of making Christ public amidst the multiple challenges of our emerging post-Christian world.

EVAN 516. Spiritual and Professional Formation. (2 Credits)

Introduction to personal and corporate formation through various dimensions such as the intellectual, physical, spiritual, social, and emotional with an emphasis on the integration of biblical perspectives. Transformational practice is encouraged through literature survey and contemporary case studies. Course is offered occasionally.

EVAN 525. Foundations of Biblical Evangelism. (4 Credits)

This course provides biblical and historical foundations for the task of communicating the gospel today. Following a detailed examination of Scripture and early church mission, students will explore contemporary challenges to the gospel and how they might meet those challenges through a diverse range of media.

EVAN 526. Gospel: Theological Perspectives on Evangelism and Renewal. (4 Credits)

Examines the gospel as the good news of God's inaugurated kingdom, with a focus on the centrality of Jesus' death and resurrection as interpretive center. Investigates the dynamic of the spread of this good news throughout Scripture and history. Explores more recent movements of renewal and revival in relation to issues of evangelism and social transformation.

EVAN 526L. Gospel Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and students interaction on topics related to Gospel. Graded pass/fail. Concurrent registration, Corequisite: EVAN 526.

EVAN 534. Apologetics in Global Contexts. (2 Credits)

Examines apologetics as the study and practice of establishing the plausibility of the Christian faith within particular cultures and contexts. Explores various philosophical and cultural frameworks for apologetics and then applies them to modernist, postmodern, multi-ethnic and global contexts and questions.

EVAN 534L. Apologetics in Global Contexts Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interaction on topics related to Apologetics. Graded pass/fail. Concurrent registration, Corequisite: EVAN 534.

EVAN 542. Church: Movements & Models. (4 Credits)

Explores different paradigms and models of church, paying special attention to the most recent emerging missional movements and their characteristics, impact and trajectory. Includes field trip visits and guest lecturers representing various existing models of churches and ministries. Assesses ministries using a number of different evaluative tools that are widely used. Fee $30.

EVAN 542L. Church: Models & Movements Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and students interaction on topics related to Church: Models and Movements. Graded pass/fail. Concurrent registration, Corequisite: EVAN 542.

EVAN 545. Culture: Emerging & Global. (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to concepts of culture and social dynamics as they relate to race, ethnicity, gender, and other complex cultural issues. Students will explore the shape of ministry and evangelism in Western and globalizing cultures, learning how to read cultural texts and trends in order to reframe ministry and evangelism in light of significant cultural shifts that are occurring.

EVAN 545L. Culture: Emerging & Global Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and students interaction on topics related to Church: Emerging and Global. Graded pass/fail. Concurrent registration, Corequisite: EVAN 545.

EVAN 546. Discipleship. (2 Credits)

This course examines the biblical and historical models and principles for the life-long process of making disciples in a changing culture. Built on the foundation of spiritual formation and mentoring, students will be challenged to grow as disciples so that they might also equip and encourage others to grow in following Jesus.

EVAN 547. Evangelistic Communication. (2 Credits)

Exposes students to the dynamics of communication and communication theory, with application to the task of communicating the gospel in contemporary contexts. The theological, conceptual, and practical role of media, drama, the arts, metaphor, and symbol will also be explored. Course is offered occasionally.

EVAN 548. Evangelism and the Local Church. (4 Credits)

Explores the theology, strategies, practice, and leadership styles associated with implementing evangelism through a variety of ecclesiological traditions and local church settings. Course is offered occasionally.

EVAN 556. Leadership and Evangelism. (2 Credits)

Examines the literature on personal leadership development, biblically and in contemporary contexts, with application to the task of leading the church or Christian agencies into evangelistic effectiveness. Special attention is given to devise or revise the mission and vision of a Christian organization seeking to be missional. Course is offered occasionally.

EVAN 558. Personal Development and Leadership. (4 Credits)

Examines the theological, theoretical, and practical foundations for leadership in relation to personal development, stages of development over the life cycle, spiritual disciplines, personal witness, and the leader’s relational skills and practices. Can be substituted for MIN 558.

EVAN 558L. Personal Dev & Leadership Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and students interaction on topics related to Personal Leadership and Development. Graded pass/fail. Concurrent registration, Corequisite: EVAN 558.

EVAN 559. Organizational and Change Leadership. (4 Credits)

Explores the processes, stages, and leadership capacities and skills for leading change in organizations. Examines biblical and theological perspectives on leadership, organizations and change. Introduces principles of social entrepreneurship. Equips students for leading churches and organizations toward becoming missional and evangelistic. Cross-listed with MIN 559.

EVAN 559L. Organizational and Change Leadership Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and students interaction on topics related to Organizational and Change Leadership. Graded pass/fail. Cross-listed with MIN 559L.

EVAN 561L. Intercultural Comm Lab. (0 Credits)

EVAN 565. Preaching and Teaching in and to Culture. (4 Credits)

This course is a study in the methods, means, and rationale of biblical interpretation and contextual teaching and preaching. The course will introduce students to various tools for exegeting the Bible and the audience toward the formation of biblically-based sermons and lessons that culturally-relevant. Prerequisite: None. Pre or Corequisite: None.

EVAN 573. Evangelism Research Methods. (2 Credits)

Equips students with the rationale and methodology of qualitative research in cultural contexts, with an emphasis on the application of qualitative methods to a specific context through research projects.

EVAN 573L. Evangelism Research Methods Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interactions on topics related to Evangelism Research Methods. Graded pass/fail. Concurrent registration, Corequisite: EVAN 573.

EVAN 611. Theology of Religions: Christian Engagement with Non-Christian Religions. (2 Credits)

The theology of religions is a field of study which attempts to account theologically for the reality of non-Christian religious traditions and religious diversity. This course will introduce students to some of the main questions in this field, especially that have reflected evangelical concerns, such as the presence of goodness, truth, and access to Christ’s atoning work outside the boundaries of the Christian church, and explore different theoretical framework for making sense of the continuities and discontinuities between the Christian faith and other religions. With the aim of equipping students to work in a religiously plural environment, students will work through troubling questions, such as the reality of asymmetric access to the Gospel and the Christian claims of religious exclusivism, and begin developing informed theological grounding for constructive engagement with non-Christian others.

EVAN 691. Ministry Practicum. (2 Credits)

Provides practical, guided ministry experience in which students serve under supervision with regular interaction and instruction in the area of ministry. Graded pass/fail.

EVAN 692. Comprehensive Exam. (0 Credits)

Prerequisite: submission of Candidacy form. Fee $75. Graded pass/fail.

EVAN 694. Seminar In Evangelism. (2 or 4 Credits)

In-depth study of selected topics growing out of special concerns of professors and students.

EVAN 695. Independent Study. (1 to 4 Credits)

EVAN 696. Internship. (2 or 4 Credits)

Graded pass/fail.

EVAN 698. Thesis/Applied Thesis. (2 or 4 Credits)

EVAN 699. Thesis/Applied Thesis Contin. (0 Credits)

See M.A. Thesis/Applied Thesis/Action Research.

Intercultural Studies

INTR 503. Academic Composition and Communication. (0 Credits)

Group and individual instruction in expository writing and oral communication skills for students from non-English backgrounds. Students receive intensive preparation in English for academic purposes such as research papers and class presentations. Graded pass/fail.

INTR 512. Theories and Principles of Counseling. (3 Credits)

Designed for marriage and family therapy students, this course provides an examination of several of the major theories of counseling with an emphasis on techniques and principles common to each theory. This course does not count towards the M.A. in Clinical Psychology.

INTR 514. Spiritual and Professional Formation. (4 Credits)

Introduction to personal and corporate formation through various dimensions such as the intellectual, physical, spiritual, social, and emotional with an emphasis on the integration of biblical perspectives. Transformational practice is encouraged through literature survey and contemporary case studies.

INTR 516. Issues and Trends in Missions. (2 or 4 Credits)

Current missiological issues and trends, including church-mission relationships, changes in mission strategies and structures, challenges to the church, and their significance to the worldwide mission of the church. Opportunity for individual student research in a particular area of interest is provided.

INTR 521. Historical Foundations. (2 Credits)

Explores key persons and movements in the expansion of the Christian church from early monasticism and the Celtic Church to Moravianism and Methodism. The missiological reinterpretation of church history focuses on the dynamics of the expansion and the implications for contemporary strategies of mission. Attention is given to the means of Holy Spirit renewal, structure of mission, the role of leadership, and the relationship among the three.

INTR 531. Theological Foundations. (2 Credits)

Using the principles of biblical exegesis and hermeneutics, the course explores God's mission from the Philistines of Abraham's and David's time, to the marginalized in New Testament society. Through this process, an appreciation is developed for theological reflection in Christian community that will impact the student's missionary vocation.

INTR 532. Contextualization in Global Settings. (4 Credits)

Analysis of the encounter of the gospel with culture within the framework of the behavioral sciences. Organized around six dimensions of religious experience and contextualization within those dimensions, with special focus on the theological dimension.

INTR 534. Mission in Acts. (4 Credits)

The course models a historical critical interpretation of Acts. Through an analysis of the discourse structure of Luke/Acts, the course seeks to deepen an understanding of the person and work of the Spirit of Jesus who empowers God's mission as it takes place through the apostles and the early church.

INTR 535. Holy Spirit and Mission. (2 or 4 Credits)

The course explores the dynamics of the work of the Holy Spirit and mission in relation to the following dimensions: personal, biblical, historical, cultural, contextual, and functional. Students are encouraged to explore their mission philosophy regarding the role of the Spirit of God for their mission context.

INTR 546. Evangelism and Church Planting. (2 or 4 Credits)

Strategies for evangelism and church development are examined and applied through case studies, field trips, contacts with resource persons, and student-led projects.

INTR 548. Discipleship. (2 Credits)

This course examines the biblical and historical models and principles for the life-long process of making disciples in a changing culture. Built on the foundation of spiritual formation and mentoring, students will be challenged to grow as disciples so that they might also equip and encourage others to grow in following Jesus.

INTR 551. Counseling Challenges in Ministry. (2 Credits)

A psychoeducative approach is used to enable Christian leaders to help individuals and families understand and deal with contemporary issues—e.g., step-families, single parenting, divorce, abortion. Other topics covered include: coping with depression, strong emotions, i.e., anger and anxiety, conflict. This course does not count toward the M.A. in Clinical Psychology.

INTR 552. Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Gender and Leadership. (2 Credits)

An exploration of the role of women in missions, including their impact on mission strategies, their unique contributions, and a discussion of critical issues they have faced since the time of the modern missionary movement.

INTR 561. Intercultural Communication. (4 Credits)

Foundational principles of intercultural communication from the fields of social psychology, cultural anthropology, and communication theory integrated with selected areas of personal encounter in cross-cultural settings.

INTR 561L. Intercultural Comm Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and students interaction on topics related to Intercultural Communication. Graded pass/fail. Concurrent registration, Corequisite: INTR 561.

INTR 562. Foundations of Intercultural Communication. (2 Credits)

Foundational principles of intercultural communication from the fields of social psychology, cultural anthropology, and communication theory.

INTR 563. Cross-Cultural Teaching and Learning. (2 Credits)

Contributions of nonformal educators, cognitive psychologists, and educational anthropologists to cross-cultural teaching and learning; attuning instruction to thinking styles, pedagogical expectations, and cultural values.

INTR 565. Folk Religions. (2 or 4 Credits)

Strategies for understanding folk religion and relating to folk religion adherents are examined and applied through discussion, case studies, media, and student-led projects.

INTR 566. Religious Life in Global Settings. (4 Credits)

Introduction to religious life through the lenses of phenomenology, folk religious studies, and the social sciences with an emphasis on how average adherents live out their lives integrated with biblical perspectives.

INTR 567. Spiritual Conflict. (2 or 4 Credits)

An examination of the principles and dynamics of spiritual conflict. Issues include theoretical considerations in the areas of theological reflection and cultural analysis, pragmatic considerations such as spiritual discipline and counseling approaches, and the missiological implications for missionary strategies.

INTR 572. Cross-Cultural Research. (2 or 4 Credits)

The rationale and methodology of qualitative research in cross-cultural contexts. Special focus on the application of qualitative methods to a specific context through research projects.

INTR 573. Qualitative Research for Second Language Educators. (2 Credits)

A survey of qualitative research techniques for use in cross-cultural contexts, with a special focus on second language education.

INTR 581. Spanish American Culture and Civilization. (4 Credits)

See SPAN 335.

INTR 588. Asian Culture & Communication. (2 Credits)

An introduction to Asian history and culture with particular emphasis on the themes/issues of the 20th century. Includes an introduction to a relevant Asian language and language-learning strategies. Principles for effective cross-cultural communication and adjustment are also considered. Taught in Asia.

INTR 591. Public Health and Nutrition in Developing Areas. (2 Credits)

An interdisciplinary approach to the problems of health and nutrition, with emphasis on Third World countries. Undergraduate restrictions: not open to freshmen, may not be applied toward the Biology major. Undergraduate prerequisite: CATC SP course.

INTR 601. Intro to TEFL Methodology. (2 Credits)

An introduction to the key concepts and skills involved in teaching English as a foreign language (EFL) in Asian classrooms. The course provides a model-based introduction to methods for teaching English as a foreign language with a specific focus on oral communication. Taught in Asia.

INTR 606. Descriptive English Grammar: Foundations. (2 Credits)

A survey of the foundational systems of English grammar, including practical issues and procedures involved in teaching grammar to ESL/EFL learners.

INTR 607. Descriptive English Grammar: Syntax and Discourse. (2 Credits)

A survey of specialized features of English grammar, including areas of difficulty for English language learners and complex multi-clause structures.

INTR 608. Second Language Acquisition. (4 Credits)

Principles and skills for the successful learning of foreign languages, including practical instruction in phonetics and language-learning strategies.

INTR 611. Theoretical Foundations of TESOL Methodology. (4 Credits)

Survey of theory and research relevant to the teaching and learning of English as a second/foreign language. Emphasis on practical applications from linguistics, psycholinguistics, and sociolinguistics.

INTR 612. Descriptive English Grammar for TESOL. (4 Credits)

A survey of English grammar and discourse analysis, including practical issues and procedures involved in teaching grammar and discourse to ESL/EFL learners.

INTR 613. TESOL Classroom Dynamics Practicum. (2 Credits)

A survey of current research and methodology related to classroom instruction. Includes an analysis of the student's teaching skills in a supervised field placement. Appropriate for both inexperienced and experienced teachers, as well as TESOL administrators.

INTR 615. Teaching Reading and Composition to ESL/EFL Learners. (2 Credits)

Theoretical and practical issues involved in teaching reading and composition, including procedures for planning and implementing classroom instruction.

INTR 616. English Phonology for ESL/EFL Teachers. (2 Credits)

The sound system of English, including procedures for planning and implementing pronunciation instruction for ESL/EFL learners.

INTR 619. Teaching Speaking and Listening to ESL/EFL Learners. (2 Credits)

Specialized training in ESL teaching methods related to oral communication. Includes techniques for the analysis of oral discourse and current methodology related to language-learning strategies and the use of media.

INTR 621. Transformational Development. (4 Credits)

The purpose of the course is to explore the biblical, theological, and theoretical foundations for transformational community development and the Christian's involvement in development on the personal and systemic levels. Foundational thinking for practice is developed through a survey of the literature and engagement with current issues and case studies.

INTR 622. Cross-cultural Human Development. (2 Credits)

The course will explore Western assumptions about human development and how people grow and change in similar and different ways across cultural contexts and across the lifespan. Topics may include: culture and socialization, physical development, language and cognition, concepts of self and personality, gender, social behavior, family, and health.

INTR 623. Families in International Settings. (2 Credits)

The course will explore cultural assumptions about human socialization and family contexts across the globe. Non-Western, Western, indigenous, immigrant, third-culture, and global nomad contexts are examined using interdisciplinary theories and frameworks. Opportunity for individual student research on a topic of interest is provided.

INTR 624. Mission to Children and Youth at Risk. (2 Credits)

This course will explore theological, biblical and theoretical principles and frameworks for understanding, analyzing, and responding to difficult situations for children, particularly those in developing nations. The student will apply contextual factors impacting human development (e.g., family, peers, community, educational opportunity, church/religion, cultural belief systems) to understand children's risk and resilience as related to social issues (e.g., poverty, abuse, child labor, human rights, HIV/AIDS, prostitution/sex trafficking, refugees, the girl-child, etc.). Public policies, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and current interventions of Christian NGOs and other child-focused organizations will be explored.

INTR 631. Principles of TESOL Teacher Mentoring. (2 Credits)

This course promotes a deeper understanding of how to engage teachers in conversations and activities that encourage professional growth. Teacher mentors will learn how to observe and give feedback to novice teachers and how to make use of a variety of professional development strategies. Taught in Asia.

INTR 632. Seminar in TESOL Teacher Mentoring. (2 Credits)

This course helps teacher mentors identify and solve problems within their teaching context. Mentors will develop an understanding of the broad context of education and language education in the country and region where they work and will apply this knowledge as they guide teachers. The mentors will also become skilled at helping teachers conduct research as a means of understanding and solving problems in their classrooms. Taught in Asia.

INTR 633. Practicum in Teacher Mentoring. (2 Credits)

Practical experience in teacher mentoring, including observing and giving feedback to teachers, advising them in lesson planning and classroom dynamics, and counseling them about their future teaching situation. Taught in Asia.

INTR 634. Adult ESL Literacy. (2 Credits)

Problems and issues in adult literacy, with a specific focus on methodology for teaching immigrants, refugees, and other English language learners, both in the US and abroad.

INTR 635. Principles of Materials Development for TESOL. (2 Credits)

Students will gain an understanding of the fundamental terminology, concepts and processes involved in the development of textbooks and other published materials, including web-based and audiovisual materials for English language teaching.

INTR 636. Practicum in Materials Development. (2 Credits)

Students will develop materials for an existing project through a step-by-step process which is modeled during a series of class sessions. This will lead to a more extensive individual materials development project for an organization or publisher, under the guidance of the professor or a mentor.

INTR 637. Problems and Issues in TESOL Materials Development. (2 Credits)

Students will present materials they have developed for a publisher or organization and will critique the materials developed by others. Discussion of current problems and issues in materials development, both theoretical and practical, will be stimulated by these presentations and the course readings.

INTR 643. English Language Learning Methods for Specialists. (2 Credits)

See LING 328.

INTR 692. Comprehensive Examination. (0 Credits)

Prerequisite: submission of Candidacy form. Fee $75. Graded pass/fail.

INTR 693. Intercultural Studies Capstone. (4 Credits)

In-depth exploration of current issues in intercultural studies. Seminar integrates core content from the INTR program into student's area of interest culminating in an integrative comprehensive paper. Prerequisite: completion of INTR 514, 521, 531, 532, 561 and 621.

INTR 694. Seminar In Missions. (2 or 4 Credits)

In-depth study of selected topics growing out of special concerns of professors and students.

INTR 695. Independent Study. (1 to 4 Credits)

INTR 696. Internship. (2 or 4 Credits)

Graded pass/fail.

INTR 698. Thesis/Applied Thesis. (4 Credits)

INTR 699. Applied Thesis/Thesis Continuation. (0 Credits)

See M.A. Thesis/Applied Thesis/Action Research.

Ministry

MIN 501. Introduction to Chaplaincy and Institutional Ministries. (2 Credits)

In a pluralistic culture that esteems individuality and spirituality, the profession of chaplaincy is rapidly expanding. This course assists participants to explore a wide range of chaplaincy possibilities – from the established military option to institutional roles (hospital, hospice and prison) to corporate, law enforcement, National Park, and university. This is an opportunity to consider one’s calling as a Gospel representative – endorsed by a faith community – to minister spirituality in professional public service.

MIN 511. Clinical Pastoral Education Practicum. (3 Credits)

Clinical Pastoral Education Practicum, i.e., CPE practicum, is a practice-based learning experience that brings students into supervised encounters with persons in clinical settings. It provides an in-depth pastoral experience with individual and group supervision by chaplains for the Associate’s certification in CPE.

MIN 512. Defending Jesus: 10 day Intensive in Israel. (4 Credits)

This course invites students into a detailed study of the life of Jesus as a key to defending and commending the Christian faith to a skeptical world. More than a study of the ‘historical Jesus’, the unit critically examines the life, teaching, miracles, death, and resurrection of Jesus as a comprehensive answer both to contemporary criticisms of Christianity and to the contemporary longings of a secular world. The bulk of the course is experienced onsite in Israel over 10 days, where students will be able to combine historical and archaeological rigor with the theological and cultural imagination necessary for commending Jesus Christ today.

MIN 547. Preaching. (2 Credits)

This course lays the biblical and theological foundations for preaching and develops preaching skills with an emphasis on faithfulness, contextualization and mission, clarity and structural soundness, and spiritual power. The theological, conceptual, and practical role of media, drama, the arts, metaphor, and symbol will also be explored.

MIN 547L. Preaching Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interaction on topics related to Preaching. Graded pass/fail. Concurrent registration with MIN 547.

MIN 558. Personal Leadership and Development in Ministry. (4 Credits)

Explores dimensions of personal leadership development and competencies. Overviews Biblical foundations and spiritual disciplines for effective and God centered leadership. Uses various personality, temperament and assessment tools and examines developmental perspectives on leadership over the lifespan. Can be substituted with EVAN 558.

MIN 561. Congregational Leadership: Worship, Discipleship, and Care. (4 Credits)

In various ways, congregational culture affects the shaping of the identity, mission and formation of all local churches. In this course, we will seek to define, exegete, and evaluate congregational culture in order to identify helpful leadership approaches for worship, discipleship, and pastoral care that can support congregational formation and mission.

MIN 561L. Congregational Leadership: Worship, Discipleship, and Care Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interaction on topics related to Congregational Leadership. Graded pass/fail. Concurrent registration with MIN 561.

MIN 692. Comprehensive Exam. (0 Credits)

Prerequisite: submission of Candidacy form. Fee $75. Graded pass/fail.

MIN 701. Spiritual Direction and Care for the Soul. (4 Credits)

This laboratory course in spiritual formation explores the relational, spiritual and missional practices of the Christian spiritual life (e.g., corporate worship, spiritual friendship, spiritual direction, small group accountability, hospitality, evangelism, compassion, social justice, creation-care). Students will study, practice, and theologically reflect on these practices.

MIN 702. Public Christianity for a Post-Christian World. (4 Credits)

This course examines the context and content of Christian mission in the “pre-Christian world,” from Jewish missionaries of the Second Temple period to the birth of Christendom following the reign of Emperor Constantine, in order learn lessons for the contemporary task of making Christ public amidst the multiple challenges of our emerging post-Christian world.

MIN 703. Personal and Ministerial Formation 1 – The Importance of Soul Care. (0 Credits)

This course will give students who are ministry leaders the space and resources to receive soul care and cultivate their own spiritual formation for a deeply-connected life with God. In so doing, students will reorient their ways of being and leading in order to sustain and enliven their work in ministry. Additional course fee required: $50.

MIN 704. Personal and Ministerial Formation 2 – The Heart of Christian Spirituality. (0 Credits)

This course will give students who are ministry leaders the space and resources to receive soul care and cultivate their own spiritual formation for a deeply-connected life with God. In so doing, students will reorient their ways of being and leading in order to sustain and enliven their work in ministry. Prerequisite: MIN 703. Additional course fee required: $50.

MIN 705. Personal and Ministerial Formation 3 – Self-Awareness and the True Self. (0 Credits)

This course will give students who are ministry leaders the space and resources to receive soul care and cultivate their own spiritual formation for a deeply-connected life with God. In so doing, students will reorient their ways of being and leading in order to sustain and enliven their work in ministry. Prerequisite: MIN 704. Additional course fee required: $50.

MIN 706. Personal and Ministerial Formation 4 – The Spiritual Journey. (0 Credits)

This course will give students who are ministry leaders the space and resources to receive soul care and cultivate their own spiritual formation for a deeply-connected life with God. In so doing, students will reorient their ways of being and leading in order to sustain and enliven their work in ministry. Prerequisite: MIN 705. Additional course fee required: $50.

MIN 707. Personal and Ministerial Formation 5 – Emotionally Healthy Spirituality. (0 Credits)

This course will give students who are ministry leaders the space and resources to receive soul care and cultivate their own spiritual formation for a deeply-connected life with God. In so doing, students will reorient their ways of being and leading in order to sustain and enliven their work in ministry. Prerequisite: MIN 706. Additional course fee required: $50.

MIN 708. Personal and Ministerial Formation 6 – Suffering and Spiritual Formation. (0 Credits)

This course will give students who are ministry leaders the space and resources to receive soul care and cultivate their own spiritual formation for a deeply-connected life with God. In so doing, students will reorient their ways of being and leading in order to sustain and enliven their work in ministry. Prerequisite: MIN 707. Additional course fee required: $50.

MIN 709. Personal and Ministerial Formation 7 – Rule of Life. (0 Credits)

This course will give students who are ministry leaders the space and resources to receive soul care and cultivate their own spiritual formation for a deeply-connected life with God. In so doing, students will reorient their ways of being and leading in order to sustain and enliven their work in ministry. Prerequisite: MIN 708. Additional course fee required: $50.

MIN 711. Formation and Soul Care. (4 Credits)

This course centers on individual spiritual formation and soul care in ministry, focusing in-depth on personal spiritual growth and how to assist others in the process. Students will engage with ministry models of spiritual formation and discipleship, examine historic Christian spiritual practices, evaluate the types of leadership and relationships which cultivate personal spiritual formation, and look at practices of spiritual direction which will be understood primarily as companioning Christians and helping them adopt patterns of Christian spiritual practices. Special topics in spiritual formation related to contemporary society and varying ministry contexts and cultures will also be considered.

MIN 712. Defending Jesus: 10 day Intensive in Israel. (4 Credits)

This course invites students into a detailed study of the life of Jesus as a key to defending and commending the Christian faith to a skeptical world. More than a study of the ‘historical Jesus’, the unit critically examines the life, teaching, miracles, death, and resurrection of Jesus as a comprehensive answer both to contemporary criticisms of Christianity and to the contemporary longings of a secular world. The bulk of the course is experienced onsite in Israel over 10 days, where students will be able to combine historical and archaeological rigor with the theological and cultural imagination necessary for commending Jesus Christ today.

MIN 811. Contemporary Issues in the Church. (4 Credits)

This course trains the student to exegete the broad culture and to respond to prevailing cultural trends that impact the church. Issues such as race, gender, and global stewardship are common contemporary issues that the church faces. Deeper trends such as individualism, collectivism, and widening cultural and political divides are also issues to be explored. A successful student will be able to understand, strategize, teach, and lead in our cultural milieu, both inside and outside of the church.

MIN 812. Gender, Sexuality, and Spirituality. (4 Credits)

Spirituality, and its manifestation in the spiritual formation of individuals and communities, is most basically about relatedness to Christ and growth toward Christlikeness. Human sexuality has become one of the most, if not the most, divisive construct in the Evangelical Church. The terms sex, gender, sexuality, sexual orientation, sexual identity, gender identity, LGBTQ+, and many more often evoke polarizing postures among Christians as we seek to understand their meaning and the implications of their meaning for people’s lives, our theologies, and our ministry practices. Culture wars intensify these postures within the church and between the church and society.

MIN 813. Advanced Preaching and Teaching. (4 Credits)

This course is an advanced study in the process of moving from the exegeted text to the message with a focus on creating expository sermons that effectively bridge to contemporary audiences. Building on foundational skills, this course will help students grow in their ability to organize exegetically sound sermons, to communicate clearly, and to engage diverse audiences.

MIN 821. Theology and History of Spiritual Formation. (4 Credits)

This course traces some of the dominant themes of Christian spiritual formation. Through biblical, theological, and historical study we will examine how various individuals and movements have experienced and sought to nurture their relationship with the Triune God.

MIN 822. Strategies for Spiritual Formation in Community. (4 Credits)

The course intends to cast a comprehensive vision for corporate spiritual formation for the local church and other spiritual communities, a vision which takes seriously the soul, the mission of the church, and depth of care for people. This course will additionally look at the issues of suffering in spiritual formation and the care of troubled and difficult people in organizations and congregations.

MIN 832. Women, the Bible, and the Church. (4 Credits)

This course explores the biblical, theological, historical, and cultural perspectives of the role of women in the Church. It will examine the socio-cultural context of the bible. It will also consider how the biblical texts concerning women have been interpreted and defined the place of women in the Church and society at large. This course will examine the understanding and application of the Christian notion of womanhood, women in Christian leadership, and the impact of feminism and feminist scholarship on biblical interpretation and ministry.

MIN 851. Research Methods. (2 Credits)

This course is necessary for successfully conducting the research/project in the D.Min. program. The student moves from defining the problem to identifying research question(s) to creating a qualitative research methodology suitable for the particular research/project that the student intends to undertake. Prerequisite: Requires Program Director approval.

MIN 894. Special Topics in Ministry. (2 to 4 Credits)

In-depth study of selected topics growing out of special concerns of professors and students.

MIN 895. Guided Research or Study. (4 Credits)

A subject or topic of interest to a DMin student is studied or researched by the student under the guidance of a faculty member or subject matter expert who is approved by the DMin Program Director.

MIN 899. Doctoral Project Continuation - Full Time. (0 Credits)

Student continues to work on MIN 992 Doctoral Project on a full time basis during the semester. This course is for Pass/Fail and is not graded. Prerequisite: MIN 992. Additional course fee required: $50.

MIN 992. Doctoral Project. (6 Credits)

The doctoral project is the capstone of the D.Min. program. It is an opportunity for students to connect knowledge gained from their coursework with the concrete realities of their ministries: (1) identifying a challenge they face in ministry and situating that challenge in their context, (2) reflecting theologically on that challenge, (3) and designing a new ministry initiative to address that challenge which must then be implemented and assessed. Prerequisite: MIN 851.

MIN 999. Doctoral Project Continuation - Part Time. (0 Credits)

Student continues to work on MIN 992 Doctoral Project on a part time basis during the semester. This course is Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: MIN 992. Additional course fee required: $50.

Mission, Ministry, and Leadership

MML 512. Leadership and Spiritual Formation. (4 Credits)

This course provides a theological and theoretical overview of the role of leader with people and in organizations with a particular focus on self-leadership. All leadership starts with the health, character and competence of a leader and, as a result, this foundational course focuses on fostering the spiritual maturity and long-term faithfulness of those called to shepherd and lead in the church and in the world.

MML 512L. Leadership and Spiritual Formation Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and students interaction on topics related to Leadership and Spiritual Formation. Graded pass/fail. Concurrent registration with MML 512.

MML 513. Theological and Systematic Foundation of the missio Dei. (4 Credits)

This course examines the missio Dei, engaging systematic theology through the hermeneutic lens of God’s mission. Using the 10 Loves of the Cape Town Commitment 2010 of the Lausanne Movement as the systematic framework for this class, students will develop a robust and systematic theology of mission, applying it to their context and life.

MML 513L. Theological and Systematic Foundations of the missio Dei Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interaction on topics related to Theological & Systematic Foundations of the missio Dei. Concurrent registration with MML 513.

MML 701. Perspectives in Missional Theology. (4 Credits)

This course will examine major systematic theological themes in Scripture through the hermeneutic lens of the mission of God. Specific attention will be given to the development of Christian doctrines and an understanding of God’s mission within the history of Christian thought and missiology, with a view to equipping students develop a biblically-grounded and contextually-focused framework for missional engagement.

Missional Church Movements

MISS 562. Launching Apostolic Movements. (4 Credits)

Focuses on developing an overview of what constitutes a missional movement by gaining a working understanding and analysis of the key elements that have often coalesced in order to catalyze missional movements in Western and majority world contexts, both historically and in more contemporary times.

MISS 564. Planting and Growing Reproducing Churches. (2 Credits)

Investigates models, principles, strategies, and methodologies for planting new churches in North America that have an apostolic ethos of continual reproduction. Surveys Biblical materials on church planting, examines the recent literature and resources, and explores networks of church planting organizations and churches

MISS 565. Incarnational Ministry for Missional Churches. (2 Credits)

Explicates the basic components of missional communities, including communion, community and mission, that emphasize entering into communities and cultures and sectors of society, rather than drawing people out of their communities, contexts, and roles into siloed religious communities.

MISS 568. Organic and Simple Church. (2 Credits)

Explores the dynamics of cell, simple, organic, and house church movements both here in North America and in other parts of the world. Special attention will be paid to multiplication factors, contextual influences, resourcing issues, organizational centralization and decentralization forces, and leadership patterns.

MISS 575. Urban Missional Movements. (2 Credits)

Examines creative urban missional reproducing movements, paying special attention to the unique opportunities, challenges, and contexts of larger urban communities. Students will gain a knowledge of urban contexts, and explore ways the church can interact with those contexts in missional engagement.

MISS 576. Missional Movements and Evangelism. (2 Credits)

Explores a research based understanding of various missional expressions and movements, learning to assess strengths and weaknesses of the various movements and expressions, and examining effective and ineffective evangelism dynamics.

MISS 692. Comprehensive Exam. (0 Credits)

Prerequisite: submission of Candidacy form. Fee $75. Graded pass/fail.

Spiritual Formation and Leadership

Christian Formation and Leadership

CFM 513. History and Philosophy of Ministry. (4 Credits)

Helps students become more informed and effective ministers through the analysis of ministry and educational philosophies that have guided the church throughout its history. Provides a framework within which to formulate a biblically and historically informed philosophy of ministry.

CFM 516. Teaching for Transformation. (4 Credits)

Promotes Christian growth through educational planning and evaluation. Methods of teaching, curriculum design, and character of the teacher are considered.

CFM 517. Developmental Theory and Spiritual Formation. (2 Credits)

An introduction to biblical, historical, and theological understandings of the nature of persons and the integration of relevant psychological and sociological understandings of human development. In addition, students will be encouraged to consider the application of these foundations to the contemporary work of Christian formation and ministry.

CFM 518. Research Methods for Ministry. (2 Credits)

An introduction to the theory and practice of research methodologies as they relate to Christian formation and ministry.

CFM 521. Personal Spiritual Formation. (2 Credits)

An introduction to personal spiritual formation, including spiritual health and the practice of spiritual disciplines. Includes an off-site weekend retreat.

CFM 522. History and Traditions of Spiritual Formation. (2 Credits)

This course traces some of the dominant themes of Christian spirituality. Through biblical, theological, and historical study, we will examine how various individuals and movements have experienced and sought to nurture their relationship with the Triune God. Particular attention is paid to developing the skills of discernment for reading these primary sources.

CFM 523. Ministry Leadership and Organization. (4 Credits)

Introduction to issues of ministry leadership, including organizational theory, ethics, conflict management, and personal concerns for integrity and spiritual health.

CFM 525. Camp Ministry in Global Context. (4 Credits)

This course explores the theory and practice of doing ministry in diverse cultural contexts in the United States and globally. Students cultivate active cultural sensitivity through tools that include taking an inventory, conducting an ethnographic study, and partnering with a Christian camp ministry from a different geo-cultural context.

CFM 532. Discipleship. (2 Credits)

This course examines the biblical and historical models and principles for the life-long process of making disciples in a changing culture. Built on the foundation of spiritual formation and mentoring, students will be challenged to grow as disciples so that they might also equip and encourage others to grow in following Jesus.

CFM 533. Prayer. (2 Credits)

Provides a theory-based examination of prayer, especially within the historic evangelical faith.

CFM 535. Advanced Curriculum Development for Ministry. (2 Credits)

This course focuses on advanced curriculum design and development for ministry purposes, and the roles of learning environments and experiences in facilitating spiritual growth. Includes practical components integral to these issues.

CFM 545. Student Development Leadership and Organization. (4 Credits)

An introduction and overview of the administration and organization of College Student Affairs with an emphasis on its historical and philosophical foundations, its basic documents and leadership strategies and issues. Staff selection, training, supervision, policy development, and program implementation and evaluation are addressed.

CFM 547. Philosophy of Ministry. (2 Credits)

This course helps students become more informed and effective ministers through the analysis of key ministry and educational philosophies. Provides a framework within which to formulate a biblically, theologically, and philosophically informed philosophy of ministry.

CFM 612. Ministry with Children and Families. (4 Credits)

This course examines the nature of family relationships and the spirituality of children in light of biblical, theological, and developmental perspectives. The course is intended to equip ministry students to understand these dynamics in their own families, in the families of those to whom they minister, and the impact of these on their ability to be effective ministers. The course also includes a consideration of church as the family of God.

CFM 613. Ministry with Children and Families. (2 Credits)

This course examines the nature of family relationships and the spirituality of children in light of biblical, theological, and developmental perspectives. The course is intended to equip ministry students to understand these dynamics in their own families, in the families of those to whom they minister, and the impact of these on their ability to be effective ministers. The course also includes a consideration of church as the family of God. Course is offered occasionally.

CFM 631. Youth Ministry. (4 Credits)

Introduces students to biblical foundations, developmental and socio-cultural theories and research, historical and contemporary practice, and philosophy of youth ministry.

CFM 651. Adult Ministries. (2 Credits)

Examines the principles and methods of adult ministry in the church with particular attention given to non-formal education. Explores the nature of defining, developing, and evaluating educational experiences in non-formal settings with an eye for their unique ministry contributions.

CFM 683. Integrative Seminar. (0 Credits)

Integrates the various courses of the CFM program into a unified whole. The Integrative Seminar fosters reflection on the academic, spiritual, and practical aspects of the degree while also assisting in plans for future growth and development in these areas. Includes a summative case study evaluation. Prerequisite: All CFM core courses must be completed or in process.

CFM 691. Concentration Mentoring Group. (0 Credits)

Within each concentration of the CFM masters program, students will meet in a small mentoring group to discuss their academic progress, spiritual formation, and development of practical ministry skills. Taken every semester, repeatable.

CFM 692. Creative Project. (2 Credits)

Prerequisite: Department approval of student's Final Project proposal.

CFM 693. Ministry Practicum. (0 Credits)

Provides students the opportunity to participate in a ministry context, integrating the theories learned in the classroom with the practices of ministry. Includes a summative assignment in which students consider the links between ministry principles, personal formation, and practical skills.

CFM 694. Current Issues in Christian Formation and Ministry. (2 or 4 Credits)

Provides opportunity for advanced students to study collectively some topic or concept in greater depth, or to explore a specialized topic and its relationship to an understanding and practice of Christian Formation and Ministry. Topics will vary and will be determined by department faculty members.

CFM 695. Independent Study. (1 to 4 Credits)

Focuses on field or library research according to individual interests and competencies in Christian Formation and Ministry.

CFM 696. Internship. (2 to 4 Credits)

Provides advanced students the opportunity to have a better understanding of ministry theory and practice by working and studying alongside a competent, authorized professional in Christian ministry. Includes a summative paper or reflection and analysis of the learning that occurred and its significance for future ministry (due after the internship). Prerequisite: Internship application approval.

CFM 698. Applied Thesis/Thesis. (2 Credits)

Prerequisite: Dept. approval of student's Final Project Proposal.

CFM 699. Final Project Continuation. (0 Credits)

Higher Education and Student Development

HESD 512. Bible in Ministry. (2 Credits)

This course acquaints students with the formative nature and power of Scripture. It explores the principles and practices of using Scripture in ministry through reading, study, devotion, and meditation in personal, small groups and teaching, and related ministries of the church.

HESD 514. Ministry in Culture. (4 Credits)

Explores foundational cultural issues from a Christian, socio-cultural perspective. Provides opportunities for students to cultivate theory and practice of ministry in the multicultural American society, as well as the Church around the world.

HESD 518. Research Methods. (2 Credits)

The course provides an overview of research and assessment methodologies. It intends to develop the students' ability to design, conduct, critique, and utilize research as an integral part of informed, reflective practice in higher education. All students in the course will propose and complete a research project in an area of student development.

HESD 521. Personal Spiritual Formation. (2 Credits)

An introduction to personal spiritual formation, including spiritual health and the practice of spiritual disciplines. Includes an off-site weekend retreat.

HESD 534. Care and Counsel in Ministry. (4 Credits)

An introduction to the basic concepts and skills involved in care and counsel within ministry contexts including an overview of the historic ministry of soul care, biblical foundations for care in ministry, major categories of human suffering, critical issues related to care in college and university contexts (e.g. Title IX) and rudimentary person-to-person helping skills. This course is designed to enable those in student development to help students understand and deal with contemporary issues-e.g., divorce, grief, suicide, conflict, etc.

HESD 546. Holistic Growth in College: An Integrated Approach. (2 Credits)

This course offers an overview of the various theories that explain college student development. The course focuses on higher education professionals' role in developing students by creating learning opportunities beyond the classroom, in all facets of the college experience. It also emphasizes the biblical view of learning as the pursuit of wisdom and its implications for student affairs work.

HESD 547. Philosophy of Ministry. (2 Credits)

This course helps students become more informed and effective ministers through the analysis of key ministry and educational philosophies. Provides a framework within which to formulate a biblically, theologically, and philosophically informed philosophy of ministry.

HESD 548. Law, Ethics, and Leadership in Higher Education. (4 Credits)

This course will focus on the character, organizational, and legal knowledge needed to lead effectively in higher education. Students will develop an understanding of ethical decision making and its application to relevant student life cases.

HESD 549. Theology and Philosophy of Ministry. (2 Credits)

This course focuses on the integration of the biblical, theological, philosophical, and practical aspects of relational ministry. Analyzing biblical principles and models of Christian discipleship, it helps students develop a comprehensive ministry philosophy that includes a theologically-informed worldview, aims for growing disciples, and methods that are consistent with Christian convictions. It encourages students to assess their personal life, calling, and vocational direction in light of these key ministry functions.

HESD 575. Conflict and Mediation. (4 Credits)

This course is designed to build a foundational understanding of the mediation process while simultaneously developing critical dispute resolution skills (active listening, problem solving, managing emotionally charged situations, and mediating disputes). Students will also reflect on how these conflict mediation methods align with their higher education roles and a biblical vision of conflict reconciliation.

HESD 595. Higher Education: Past, Present, and Future. (4 Credits)

Within a broader overview of higher education, the course presents the history, philosophy, and values of higher education and its role in educating the whole student. The course highlights the changing nature of the college student experience and the approaches to student support in the US and internationally. It examines current issues and new realities likely to shape the future of higher education.

HESD 602. Research and Reflective Practice. (4 Credits)

The course provides an overview of research and assessment methodologies. It intends to develop the students' ability to design, conduct, critique, and utilize research as an integral part of informed, reflective practice in higher education. All students in the course will propose and complete a research project in an area of student development.

HESD 608. Well-Being in Young Adults. (2 Credits)

This course introduces basic counseling knowledge and helping skills, which complement the educational and developmental aspects of student affairs work and help practitioners be more effective in their service. The course reinforces the collaborative role higher education professionals have in helping students develop holistically. Further, it addresses both higher education staff and students' well-being, including topics of self-care, resilience, and flourishing.

HESD 614. Diversity and Student Development: Building Communities of Shalom. (2 Credits)

This course elaborates on the awareness, knowledge, and skills higher education professionals need to create a climate of hospitality and belonging and enact policies and practices that are just, representative of, and responsive to the needs of all community members. It emphasizes student development staff's role in fostering kingdom diversity and unity by serving, developing, and discipling students of all backgrounds. Prerequisite: Newly proposed MML Common Ethos course 5XX: Cultural Engagement.

HESD 634. Well-Being in Higher Education. (4 Credits)

This course introduces basic counseling knowledge and helping skills, which complement the educational and developmental aspects of student affairs work and help practitioners be more effective in their service. The course reinforces the collaborative role higher education professionals have in helping students develop holistically. Further, it addresses both higher education staff and students' well-being, including topics of self-care, resilience, and flourishing.

HESD 636. Leadership in Higher Education. (2 Credits)

This course focuses on the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to lead diverse and multigenerational teams in higher education. Students review leadership and management theories, models, and lessons, evaluating them from a Biblical perspective and developing a personal philosophy of leadership. The course connects theory to practice through interviews with higher education leaders and case examples from the field.

HESD 639. Legal Issues in Higher Education. (2 Credits)

This course will provide an overview of the key legal issues affecting higher education and student affairs. Students will examine institutional decision making, policies, and practices through the lenses of legal compliance, mission integrity, fairness, and equity. Additionally, they will practice identifying legal challenges and proactive solutions to address them.

HESD 641. Emerging Adult Development. (4 Credits)

The course explores the developmental and cultural dynamics of the young adult years, including cognitive, moral, and faith development, values, psychosocial changes, and the role of higher education in supporting holistic growth. The course introduces the philosophy of emerging adult discipleship and its applications for identity development, character education, worldview construction, and spiritual formation.

HESD 692. Creative Project. (2 Credits)

Prerequisite: Department approval of student's Final Project proposal.

HESD 695. Independent Study. (1 to 4 Credits)

Guided reading and/or research in an area of specialization within the field of Higher Education and Student Development.

HESD 696. Professional Practice and Portfolio: Capstone. (2 Credits)

This capstone course helps students refine their vocational direction, enhance their competencies, and launch their professional journey. It directly connects theory with professional practice through a 150-hour practicum in an approved higher education setting under supervision. The course supports students in completing their professional portfolio, which exhibits evidence of their growth experienced throughout the program of study.

HESD 697. Research Project. (2 Credits)

Extending the quantitative analysis research completed in HESD 518, Research Methods, students will complete a research project, examining the literature that is aligned with the variables identified in the Research Methods class, culminating in a significant, final paper required for the Masters Degree in Higher Education and Student Development.

HESD 698. Applied Thesis. (2 Credits)

Prerequisite: Department approval of student's thesis proposal.

HESD 699. Final Project Continuation. (0 Credits)

Prerequisites: HESD 692 or HESD 698.

Leadership

LEAD 503. Cultural Engagement. (2 Credits)

This course introduces students to concepts of culture and social dynamics as they relate to various race, ethnicity, gender and other complex cultural issues. Students will be equipped to work and serve with and among diverse people in various contexts. Cross-listed with OAL 503.

LEAD 512. Leadership and Spiritual Formation. (4 Credits)

This course provides a theological and theoretical overview of the role of leader with people and in organizations with a particular focus on self-leadership. All leadership starts with the health, character and competence of a leader and, as a result, this foundational course focuses on fostering the spiritual maturity and long-term faithfulness of those called to shepherd and lead in the church and in the world. Cross-listed with OAL 512.

LEAD 555. Leadership Concepts & Theories. (2 Credits)

Provides a foundation for understanding macro, mezzo, and micro levels of leadership. Includes a theological grounding of leadership and an overview of key leader and leadership theories and models that span different contexts and cultures. Students will assess their own competency at each level of leadership and then create a development plan for growth.

LEAD 557. Foundations of Leadership in a Globalized World. (4 Credits)

This course aims to facilitate the personal leadership development of students by identifying core leadership principles and exploring ways to nurture and adapt leadership in different cultural and organizational contexts in a globalized world. It integrates scholarly works on leadership, scriptural illustrations, and case studies, helping students refine their leadership knowledge, motivations, dispositions, and practices.

LEAD 557L. Foundations of Leadership in a Globalized World Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interaction on topics related to Foundations of Leadership in a Globalized World. Concurrent registration with LEAD 557.

LEAD 558. Personal Leadership and Ethics. (4 Credits)

Examines the biblical, theoretical, and practical foundations for personal leadership. Specific areas of focus will include leader capacity and capability, justice and forgiveness, leadership style, stages of development over the life cycle, spiritual disciplines, personal witness, and building support networks. The course encourages reflection on the ethical considerations of power, conflict management, and personal concerns for integrity and personal health.

LEAD 559. Organizational and Change Leadership. (4 Credits)

This course explores organizational theory, processes, stages and leadership capacities and skills for leading change and cultivating innovation in organizations. Examines biblical and theological perspectives on leadership, organizations and change. Attention will be given to principles of social entrepreneurship, managing uncertainty and conflict, awareness of power dynamics, leader and organization adaptability and leadership aptitude for change and successful transition.

LEAD 559L. Organizational and Change Leadership Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interaction on topics related to Organizational And Change Leadership. Concurrent registration with LEAD 559.

LEAD 561. Communication for Leadership. (2 Credits)

This course is designed to grow your communications skills in this course as you understand communication principles that enable you to be more persuasive and influential in a variety of leadership settings. You will study recent research advancements in organizational communication studies including investigation of power and influence tactics, upward and downward communication, leader-member exchange, framing, culture, ethics, gender influence, power allocation, social media influence, communication theory, communication roles, and group work.

LEAD 573. Qualitative Research Methods. (2 Credits)

Equips students with the rationale and methodology of qualitative research, with an emphasis on the application of qualitative methods to a specific context through research proposals.

LEAD 611. Foundations of Organizational Structure: Finance, Operations, Governance, and Legal. (2 Credits)

The Foundations of Organizational Structure course is designed to introduce students to the competences necessary to oversee and manage a variety of entities, both for profit and not-for-profit, with emphasis on the way operations, financial integrity, management (governance) and fiscal and legal reporting, compliance, and other regulatory requirements. Students will gain an understanding of the functioning of an organization, responsibility for governance, and obtain a working knowledge of financial statements, balance sheet and income statement and be able to understand and use metrics to evaluate health and sustainability of the organization.

LEAD 611L. Foundations of Organizational Structure: Finance, Operations, Governance, and Legal Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interaction on topics related to Foundations of Organizational Structure: Finance, Operations, Governance, and Legal. Concurrent registration with LEAD 611.

LEAD 615. Entrepreneurial Marketing. (2 Credits)

Entrepreneurial marketing combines two disciplinary fields of entrepreneurship and marketing. The essence of entrepreneurship is creation of value through innovation. The essence of marketing is communication and delivery of value. As the merger of the two fields, entrepreneurial marketing is about creating, communicating and delivering value (i.e. something worthwhile for others) through innovative means. This class will introduce the concepts, tools and methods of entrepreneurial marketing. This class will also explore biblical principles on marketing communication, and consider how we can honor God and serve others through marketing.

LEAD 615L. Entrepreneurial Marketing Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interaction on topics related to Entrepreneurial Marketing. Concurrent registration with LEAD 615.

LEAD 621. Introduction to Nonprofits. (2 Credits)

A nonprofit (all called not-for-profit or non-profit) has many moving parts, while balancing the many requirements and reaching the mission and vision. This course guides students through those parts while incorporating best practices, and common pitfalls for those involved in a nonprofit. Whether a new nonprofit or a mature organization, students will understand the various challenges of nonprofits and options to mitigate challenges in the nonprofit sector as a whole. Although not comprehensive, students will be exposed to real-life situations and experiential learning in this introduction to nonprofits.

LEAD 621L. Introduction to Nonprofits Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interaction on topics related to Introduction to Nonprofits. Concurrent registration with LEAD 621.

LEAD 623. Leading and Managing a Sports Organization. (2 Credits)

This course builds an understanding of sports management in theory and practice. Tools for organizing teams and budgets are given. The student will be equipped to plan, fund, program, direct, evaluate and assess a sports program’s effectiveness. Students will learn how to manage logistics – the who, what, where, when, and how – of running events, including task list development, process management, and development of contingency plans. Strategies and techniques required to run successful sporting, workplace wellness, and fitness and exercise programs will be applied.

LEAD 625. Sports Ethics and Ministry. (2 Credits)

This course builds an understanding of sports ministry by providing an ethical foundation, organizational tools, communication insights, and showing how the Christian can advance evangelism and discipleship through sports. Questions of ethical competition among both youth and adults are addressed. The student will be equipped to plan, fund, program, direct, and assess a sports ministry’s effectiveness with an emphasis on outreach to athletes on school and college campuses, in the local church, and with community organizations. Students will learn how to manage logistics – the who, what, where, when, and how – of running a sports ministry, including task list development, process management, and development of contingency plans.

LEAD 627. Global Entrepreneurship: Launching a Missional Enterprise. (2 Credits)

This course provides tools to help students evaluate and develop new business ideas into effective missional enterprises. It teaches the entrepreneurial process in a cross-cultural context, and the Biblical underpinnings of entrepreneurship. Successful business ventures improve life for customers, provide financially for workers, indirectly support vendors and suppliers and, through taxes, they support local infrastructure and government. On a spiritual level, enterprises teach dependence on God for wisdom, protection, and favor. Healthy companies may also serve missional goals and influence culture positively. But business is risky; losses and bankruptcies are costly. This course aims to improve the success rate of missional enterprises by equipping students with the wisdom of Kingdom-minded entrepreneurs who have gone before them.

LEAD 631. Leading Nonprofit Organizations. (4 Credits)

Leading a nonprofit requires a wise gathering and deploying of resources, including people, processes, and passion. This course prepares students to effectively lead a nonprofit while incorporating a heart for people first, and a decisive mind for process and action second, all undergirded by missional passion. Students will understand the various challenges of each resource and options to mitigate challenges in the nonprofit sector as a whole. Students will be exposed to real-life situations and experiential learning to lead a nonprofit well through people, processes, and with passion.

LEAD 631L. Leading Nonprofit Organizations Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interaction on topics related to Leading Nonprofit Organizations. Concurrent registration with LEAD 631.

LEAD 633. Character and Leadership. (4 Credits)

This course will emphasize character development through the lens of Christian beliefs and practices of our faith. The topics exploring character will include theology, Christian spiritual formation, ancient virtues, modern personality theories, non-cognitive models, institutional character, processes for character formation, and cultural and individual dangers that impede its development.

LEAD 633L. Character and Leadership Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interaction on topics related to Character and Leadership. Concurrent registration with LEAD 633.

LEAD 635. Managing for High Impact: Purpose, Planning, Operations, and Execution. (4 Credits)

Every organization is built to flourish. Flourishing, as the economist Anne Bradley explains, is “God’s Kingdom on earth.” It’s us living in God’s abundance “as an image bearer of our creator.” It means becoming everything we are created to be. Since the reality is that not all organizations flourish, how do we create impactful and flourishing organizations? Flourishing organizations have distinct characteristics. They generate material provision (economic capital), build authentic relationships (social capital), and instill a purpose for living (spiritual capital) among their constituency. The High Impact Business model is designed to enable organizations to create economic, social, and spiritual capital, and become a catalyst for flourishing. This course will take you through exercises to learn how to transform ordinary organizations into impactful and flourishing organizations.

LEAD 641. Biblical and Theological Foundations of Leadership. (2 Credits)

Approaching leadership as a unique role exercised by various members of Christ’s body, this course considers the biblical and theological discernment necessary to be a witness to Christ as a Christian leader. The course will focus on the development of Christian thought about leadership, as well as offering frameworks for engaging leadership theories and navigating organizations from a biblical and theological perspective. The overarching goal of the course is to provide a framework for a thoroughly biblical and theological approach to leadership.

LEAD 641L. Biblical & Theological Foundations of Leadership Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interaction on topics related to Biblical & Theological Foundations of Leadership. Concurrent registration with LEAD 641.

LEAD 643. Theology of Work: Equipping God's People to Flourish in their Calling. (2 Credits)

We spend most of our waking hours at work. What does the Bible have to say about our purpose and role at work and in the marketplace? This class explores biblical themes of God’s intention for humanity as well as the changing nature of work in the history of creation, fall and redemption. The aim is to equip Christ-followers with robust theology of work to flourish and be the salt and light in their place of calling.

LEAD 643L. Theology of Work: Equipping God's People to Flourish in their Calling Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interaction on topics related to Theology of Work: Equipping God’s People to Flourish in their Calling. Concurrent registration with LEAD 643.

LEAD 645. Mental Health and the Leader. (2 Credits)

Examines the theological, psychological, and practical foundations for effective mental health ministry in the contexts of the local church and the marketplace. Leaders will see perspectives on the history of pastoral care, the nature of persons, and understanding essentials of mental illness. Best practices for people-helping and the vital importance of character formation for leaders will be emphasized throughout.

LEAD 645L. Mental Health and the Leader Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interaction on topics related to Mental Health and the Leader. Concurrent registration with LEAD 645.

LEAD 647. The Best and Worst of Christian History: Key Insights for Today's Leaders. (2 Credits)

This course offers a sweeping survey of Christian history, with special attention to the first thousand years. It explores the many and varied ways Christian leaders both embodied and betrayed the way of Jesus Christ. While heavily informed by the relevant primary sources and historical best-practice, the course seeks to draw out tentative lessons for contemporary ethics, worship, mission, social engagement, and, especially, Christian leadership.

LEAD 647L. The Best and Worst of Christian History: Key Insights for Today’s Leaders Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interaction on topics related to The Best and Worst of Christian History: Key Insights for Today’s Leaders. Concurrent registration with LEAD 647.

LEAD 652. Strategic Management. (2 Credits)

This Strategic Management course is designed to provide a fundamental exploration of organizations in their environments and provide an introduction to the strategic management process with a focus on Strategic Planning and Analysis, Evaluating the Opportunities and Threats Landscape, Establishing Strategic Direction and Leadership, Formulating a Business and Corporate Strategy, and Strategy Implementation and Control.

LEAD 652L. Strategic Management Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interaction on topics related to Strategic Leadership. Concurrent registration with LEAD 652.

LEAD 655. Leading Effective Organizations: Structural, Financial, and Legal Foundations. (4 Credits)

The Leading Effective Organizations course is designed to introduce students to the competences necessary to oversee and manage a variety of entities, including for profit and not-for-profit organizations, with emphasis on operations, financial integrity, management, governance, fiscal and legal reporting, compliance, and other regulatory requirements. Students will gain an understanding of the functioning of an organization, responsibility for governance, obtain a working knowledge of financial statements, balance sheets and income statements and be able to understand and use metrics to evaluate the health and sustainability of organizations.

LEAD 662. Leading Multicultural Teams. (2 Credits)

Explores concepts and skills needed for socially responsible and ethical leadership of multicultural teams. Topics covered include developing and coaching others cross-culturally, leading virtual teams, creating inclusive teams and organizations, appreciating and capitalizing on cultural diversity, and creative problem solving and conflict resolution.

LEAD 662L. Leading Multicultural Teams Lab. (0 Credits)

Promotes personal and professional growth through weekly professor and student interaction on topics related to Leading Multicultural Teams. Concurrent registration with LEAD 662.

LEAD 692. Special Topics in Leadership. (2 Credits)

Courses to provide opportunity for students to study a concept or topic in greater depth, or to explore a specialized topic and its relationship to leadership. Topics will vary and will be determined by department faculty members.

LEAD 693. Capstone. (2 Credits)

In-depth exploration of current issues in global leadership. Seminar integrates core content from the Global Leadership degree in an integrative comprehensive paper. Graded pass/fail. Pre or Corequisite: LEAD 547, LEAD 557, and LEAD 559.

LEAD 694. Special Topics in Leadership. (4 Credits)

Courses to provide opportunity for students to study a concept or topic in greater depth, or to explore a specialized topic and its relationship to leadership. Topics will vary and will be determined by department faculty members.

LEAD 695. Independent Study. (1 to 4 Credits)

LEAD 696. Internship. (2 or 4 Credits)

LEAD 811. Healthy and Spiritual Leadership. (4 Credits)

This Healthy & Spiritual Leadership course is designed to provide the busy pastor and Christian leader an opportunity to reflect on their work-life balance by examining their ministry and leadership activities. The student will reflect on their mission, calling, as well as their capacity. The context of this self-focus will be their behavior to be their authentic self, pay attention to their soul, and desire to build a sustainable ministry on spiritual, emotional, intellectual, and relational dimensions.

LEAD 831. History of Women in the Church. (4 Credits)

This course will look at the unique contributions women have made to the Church, from the first century through the late-20th century. Such advances usually happened despite official impediments to women’s spiritual leadership and active ministry. The course highlights conflicts women faced as a result of doctrine, traditions, and practices of the Church, as well as issues of ethnic and racial bias.

LEAD 833. Gender Issues in Ministry Leadership. (4 Credits)

This course explores gender issues encountered by women in ministry leadership in the church and in other ministry vocations. It will explore issues specific to women in ministry, as well as issues faced by women in leadership across sectors. The topics will include differing rates of representation, leadership styles, organizational practices, gender bias, and other current issues from a variety of perspectives. Students will engage current scholarship in order to understand their current setting and to gain resources and tools that will benefit their ministry context.

Outdoor and Adventure Leadership

OAL 503. Cultural Engagement. (2 Credits)

This course introduces students to concepts of culture and social dynamics as they relate to various race, ethnicity, gender and other complex cultural issues. Students will be equipped to work and serve with and among diverse people in various contexts. Cross-listed with LEAD 503.

OAL 512. Leadership and Spiritual Formation. (4 Credits)

This course provides a theological and theoretical overview of the role of leader with people and in organizations with a particular focus on self-leadership. All leadership starts with the health, character and competence of a leader and, as a result, this foundational course focuses on fostering the spiritual maturity and long-term faithfulness of those called to shepherd and lead in the church and in the world. Cross-listed with LEAD 512.

OAL 516. Camp Ministry in Global Contexts. (2 Credits)

This course explores the landscape of Christian camping in local and global contexts. It examines the theory and practice of doing ministry in a diverse changing world. Students will nurture an understanding of how ministry in culture involves contextualization and focus on a global region of their choice. Pre or Corequisite: OAL 503.

OAL 517. Developmental Theory and Spiritual Formation. (2 Credits)

An introduction to biblical, historical, and theological understandings of the nature of persons and the integration of relevant psychological and sociological understandings of human development. In addition, students will be encouraged to consider the application of these foundations to the contemporary work of Christian formation and ministry.

OAL 518. Assessment and Innovation. (2 Credits)

An introduction to theories and approaches of assessment theory as they relate to outdoor adventure ministry and an exploration of recent scholarly research in the field for the purpose of improving our practice.

OAL 521. Personal Spiritual Formation. (2 Credits)

An introduction to personal spiritual formation, including spiritual health and the practice of spiritual disciplines. Includes an off-site weekend retreat.

OAL 534. Care and Counsel in Ministry. (2 Credits)

An introduction to the basic concepts and skills involved in care and counsel within experiential and other Christian formation ministry contexts including an overview of the historic ministry of soul care, biblical foundations for care in ministry, major categories of human suffering, and rudimentary person-to-person helping skills. This course is designed to enable those in camp ministry to help individuals and families understand and deal with contemporary issues--e.g., divorce, grief, suicide, conflict, etc.

OAL 547. Philosophy of Ministry. (2 Credits)

This course helps students become more informed and effective ministers through the analysis of key ministry and educational philosophies. Provides a framework within which to formulate a biblically, theologically, and philosophically informed philosophy of ministry.

OAL 548. Program Planning and Leadership. (2 Credits)

his course studies the process of developing outdoor and adventure based programs which will align with the mission, vision and values of an organization and serve the identified target groups in a meaningful way. As part of this course, students will build on their philosophy of ministry by developing, implementing and evaluating programs in real ministry settings.

OAL 549. Program Philosophy and Planning. (4 Credits)

This course helps students become more informed and effective ministers through the analysis of key ministry and educational philosophies and an exploration of core elements of ministry program design, implementation, and evaluation.

OAL 555. Women in Outdoor Ministry. (2 Credits)

This course will explore the history and experiences of women in an outdoor ministry context by weaving three threads of inquiry together: history, theology, and studies on women in the workplace. It will trace the involvement of women in outdoor ministry as both participants and leaders over the last century, introduce students to the varied theological perspectives on women’s roles in a ministry/church context, and explore research and perspectives on women in the workplace in general, as well is in outdoor leadership in particular.

OAL 556. Gap Programming and Leadership. (2 Credits)

This course provides an overview of Gap year programs and the best practices that help make them transformative experiences for emerging adults. The course applies appropriate principles from OAL courses to this unique and growing application. Prerequisite: OAL 662.

OAL 564. Challenge Course Leadership. (4 Credits)

This course applies theories and principles of leadership, spiritual development and experiential education to challenge programming specifically utilizing ropes courses, team initiatives, climbing, and other outdoor adventure activities. Students will apply learning by developing, leading and evaluating short term (1/2-day to 3-day) adventure education experiences for a variety of groups. This course is offered as an intensive at HoneyRock. Prerequisite: OAL 595.

OAL 566. Temporary Communities and the Church. (2 Credits)

This course explores the mechanics of temporary systems how they have served diverse communities past and present. Students examine how God uses temporary communities to form his people, offering models for teaching, hospitality, renewal, and facilitating transitions.

OAL 595. Foundations of Experiential Education. (2 Credits)

This course explores theoretical and theological foundations of experiential education using different environmental contexts as the classroom. Diverse education design and teaching methodologies, group facilitation, and leadership in different contexts will be used to meet course objectives. The course requires individual and group preparatory and post residential work.

OAL 662. Theology and Practice of Outdoor Ministry. (4 Credits)

This course is the foundational overview of the Outdoor Adventure Leadership Concentration of the Wheaton Graduate School. It is designed to equip students personally, spiritually and communally for a life of leadership and ministry in outdoor related ministries by helping students to develop personal vision, ministry skills, interpersonal competence, and a ministry philosophy. This course is offered in a modular format at HoneyRock.

OAL 663. Organizational Leadership and Staff Development in Outdoor Ministry. (4 Credits)

The outdoor and adventure ministry context is an excellent laboratory for equipping leaders for the church and society worldwide. This course is designed to help students develop principles and competencies to enhance their own leadership practice and to cultivate an approach to ministry that facilitates leadership development in those who serve and are served in the adventure ministry setting. Additionally, students will learn principles for effective organizational leadership. Students will design and evaluate leadership development programs in an outdoor ministry setting as part of this course. Offered in a modular format at HoneyRock.

OAL 664. Wilderness Programming and Leadership. (4 Credits)

This course emphasizes the uniqueness of the wilderness classroom and teaches students to utilize extensive wilderness expeditions to draw others to Christ and develop them into whole and effective people. The course covers program models and planning processes, various outdoor and leadership skills needed for wilderness ministry, and how God uses silence, creation, and group problem-solving to develop disciples. It is offered almost entirely in the wilderness classroom and as an extended expedition during multiple times and at multiple sites each year. This course is offered through HoneyRock.

OAL 665. Wilderness Program Management. (4 Credits)

This course will prepare students to design and manage wilderness programming appropriate for Christian and secular colleges, non-profit and for-profit programs that feature immersive wilderness experiences. Students with current Wilderness Education Association “Certified Outdoor Leader” and 50+ days of relevant field time will complete requirements leading to WEA “Certified Outdoor Educator” qualifications. Additional course fee required: $500 to cover certification fees, travel expenses for instructors and gear use. Prerequisite: OAL 664.

OAL 682. Integrative Seminar. (2 Credits)

Integrates the core courses in the OAL the program into a unified whole. The Integrative Seminar fosters reflection on the academic, spiritual, and practical aspects of the degree while also assisting in plans for future growth and development in these areas. Includes a summative case study evaluation and final compilation of the students portfolio. Prerequisite: All OAL core courses must be completed or in process. This course should be taken the final semester of a student's enrollment.

OAL 683. Integrative Seminar. (0 Credits)

Integrates the various courses of the program into a unified whole. The Integrative Seminar fosters reflection on the academic, spiritual, and practical aspects of the degree while also assisting in plans for future growth and development in these areas. Includes a summative case study evaluation. Prerequisite: All core courses must be completed or in process.

OAL 692. Creative Project. (2 Credits)

Prerequisite: Department approval of student's Final Project proposal.

OAL 694. Current Issues. (2 to 4 Credits)

Provides opportunity for advanced students to study collectively some topic or concept in greater depth, or to explore a specialized topic and its relationship to an understanding and practice of Outdoor and Adventure Ministry.

OAL 695. Independent Study. (2 to 4 Credits)

Focuses on field or library research according to individual interests and competencies in Outdoor and Adventure Ministry.

OAL 696. Internship. (2 to 4 Credits)

Provides advanced students the opportunity to have a better understanding of ministry theory and practice by working and studying alongside a competent, authorized professional in Christian ministry. Includes a summative paper or reflection and analysis of the learning that occurred and its significance for future ministry (due after the internship). Prerequisite: Internship application approval.

OAL 698. Thesis/Applied Thesis. (2 Credits)

Prerequisite: Dept. approval of student's Final Project Proposal.

OAL 699. Thesis/Creative Project Continuation. (0 Credits)